open access

Vol 63, No 4 (2004)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2004-09-16
Submitted: 2012-02-06
Get Citation

The persistence of the sciatic artery

George Paraskevas, Basilios Papaziogas, John Gigis, Argirios Mylonas, Panagiotis Gigis
Folia Morphol 2004;63(4):515-518.

open access

Vol 63, No 4 (2004)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2004-09-16
Submitted: 2012-02-06

Abstract

The persistent sciatic artery (PSA) is a rare anatomical variant where the internal iliac artery and the axial artery of the embryo provide the major supply of the lower limb, the superficial femoral artery being usually poorly developed or absent. We describe an extremely large right PSA in a 79-year-old male cadaver during a medical gross anatomy course, with simultaneous existence of a hypoplastic superficial and deep femoral artery. The PSA, which was a continuation of the anterior division of the right internal iliac artery, entered the buttock through the greater sciatic foramen situated in the gluteal region laterally to the sciatic nerve and in the mid thigh medially to the same nerve, becoming in the popliteal fossa the popliteal artery. Neither the superficial nor the deep femoral artery had communication with the popliteal artery. Because the PSA in our study was the only blood supply to the lower limb, we present the embryologic origins and the clinical anatomy of this artery.

Abstract

The persistent sciatic artery (PSA) is a rare anatomical variant where the internal iliac artery and the axial artery of the embryo provide the major supply of the lower limb, the superficial femoral artery being usually poorly developed or absent. We describe an extremely large right PSA in a 79-year-old male cadaver during a medical gross anatomy course, with simultaneous existence of a hypoplastic superficial and deep femoral artery. The PSA, which was a continuation of the anterior division of the right internal iliac artery, entered the buttock through the greater sciatic foramen situated in the gluteal region laterally to the sciatic nerve and in the mid thigh medially to the same nerve, becoming in the popliteal fossa the popliteal artery. Neither the superficial nor the deep femoral artery had communication with the popliteal artery. Because the PSA in our study was the only blood supply to the lower limb, we present the embryologic origins and the clinical anatomy of this artery.
Get Citation

Keywords

persistence; sciatic artery; anatomy

About this article
Title

The persistence of the sciatic artery

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 63, No 4 (2004)

Pages

515-518

Published online

2004-09-16

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2004;63(4):515-518.

Keywords

persistence
sciatic artery
anatomy

Authors

George Paraskevas
Basilios Papaziogas
John Gigis
Argirios Mylonas
Panagiotis Gigis

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl