open access

Vol 65, No 1 (2006)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2005-12-05
Submitted: 2012-02-06
Get Citation

The biodegradation of hydroxyapatite bone graft substitutes in vivo

E. Rumpel, E. Wolf, E. Kauschke, V. Bienengräber, T. Bayerlein, T. Gedrange, P. Proff
Folia Morphol 2006;65(1):43-48.

open access

Vol 65, No 1 (2006)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2005-12-05
Submitted: 2012-02-06

Abstract

Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics are widely used for bone reconstruction. They are osteoconductive and serve as structural scaffolds for the deposition of new bone. Generally, scaffold materials should be degradable as they affect the mechanical properties of the reconstructed bone negatively. Degradation by osteoclasts during the bone remodelling process is desirable but often does not take place. In the current study we analysed by light microscopy the degradation of two granular HA implants in critically sized defects in the mandibula of Goettingen mini-pigs five weeks after implantation. Bio-Oss® consists of sintered bovine bone and NanoBone® is a synthetic HA produced in a sol-gel process in the presence of SiO2. We found that both biomaterials were degraded by osteoclasts with ruffled borders and acid phosphatase activity. The osteoclasts created resorption lacunae and resorptive trails and contained mineral particles. Frequently, resorption surfaces were in direct contact with bone formative surfaces on one granule. Granules, especially of NanoBone®, were also covered by osteoclasts if located in vascularised connective tissue distant from bone tissue. However, this usually occurred without the creation of resorption lacunae. The former defect margins consisted of newly formed bone often without remnants of bone substitutes. Our results show that the degradation of both biomaterials corresponds to the natural bone degradation processes and suggest the possibility of complete resorption during bone remodelling.

Abstract

Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics are widely used for bone reconstruction. They are osteoconductive and serve as structural scaffolds for the deposition of new bone. Generally, scaffold materials should be degradable as they affect the mechanical properties of the reconstructed bone negatively. Degradation by osteoclasts during the bone remodelling process is desirable but often does not take place. In the current study we analysed by light microscopy the degradation of two granular HA implants in critically sized defects in the mandibula of Goettingen mini-pigs five weeks after implantation. Bio-Oss® consists of sintered bovine bone and NanoBone® is a synthetic HA produced in a sol-gel process in the presence of SiO2. We found that both biomaterials were degraded by osteoclasts with ruffled borders and acid phosphatase activity. The osteoclasts created resorption lacunae and resorptive trails and contained mineral particles. Frequently, resorption surfaces were in direct contact with bone formative surfaces on one granule. Granules, especially of NanoBone®, were also covered by osteoclasts if located in vascularised connective tissue distant from bone tissue. However, this usually occurred without the creation of resorption lacunae. The former defect margins consisted of newly formed bone often without remnants of bone substitutes. Our results show that the degradation of both biomaterials corresponds to the natural bone degradation processes and suggest the possibility of complete resorption during bone remodelling.
Get Citation

Keywords

osteoclasts; bone defects; Goettingen miniature pig; mandibula

About this article
Title

The biodegradation of hydroxyapatite bone graft substitutes in vivo

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 65, No 1 (2006)

Pages

43-48

Published online

2005-12-05

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2006;65(1):43-48.

Keywords

osteoclasts
bone defects
Goettingen miniature pig
mandibula

Authors

E. Rumpel
E. Wolf
E. Kauschke
V. Bienengräber
T. Bayerlein
T. Gedrange
P. Proff

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl