open access

Vol 68, No 3 (2009)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2009-05-13
Submitted: 2012-02-06
Get Citation

Superficial brachioradial artery (radial artery originating from the axillary artery): a case report and embryological background

M. Konarik, J. Knize, V. Baca, D. Kachlik
Folia Morphol 2009;68(3):174-178.

open access

Vol 68, No 3 (2009)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2009-05-13
Submitted: 2012-02-06

Abstract

A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery, concerning the variant called superficial brachioradial artery (arteria brachioradialis superficialis) was described, with special regard to its embryological origin. The left upper limb of a male cadaver was dissected in successive steps from the axillary fossa distally to the palmar region. A variant artery, stemming from the end of the third segment of the axillary artery, followed a superficial course distally. It skipped the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm, crossed ventrally to the palm, and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of so-called “brachioradial artery” (inexactly called a “radial artery with a high origin”). The origin of the brachioradial artery directly from the axillary artery belongs to the rare variants of the arterial pattern of the upper limb. Its incidence is approximately 3%. Moreover, this vascular variant was associated with another one concerning the brachial plexus. The medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm joined the median nerve in the middle third of the arm and ran further distally as a common trunk, as the normal median nerve does. Anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is crucial for radiodiagnostic and surgical procedures, especially in cases of trauma. The superficially located artery brings an elevated risk of bleeding complications in unexpected situations.

Abstract

A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery, concerning the variant called superficial brachioradial artery (arteria brachioradialis superficialis) was described, with special regard to its embryological origin. The left upper limb of a male cadaver was dissected in successive steps from the axillary fossa distally to the palmar region. A variant artery, stemming from the end of the third segment of the axillary artery, followed a superficial course distally. It skipped the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm, crossed ventrally to the palm, and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of so-called “brachioradial artery” (inexactly called a “radial artery with a high origin”). The origin of the brachioradial artery directly from the axillary artery belongs to the rare variants of the arterial pattern of the upper limb. Its incidence is approximately 3%. Moreover, this vascular variant was associated with another one concerning the brachial plexus. The medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm joined the median nerve in the middle third of the arm and ran further distally as a common trunk, as the normal median nerve does. Anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is crucial for radiodiagnostic and surgical procedures, especially in cases of trauma. The superficially located artery brings an elevated risk of bleeding complications in unexpected situations.
Get Citation

Keywords

superficial brachioradial artery; arteria brachioradialis; axillary artery; radial artery; anatomy; variant; median nerve

About this article
Title

Superficial brachioradial artery (radial artery originating from the axillary artery): a case report and embryological background

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 68, No 3 (2009)

Pages

174-178

Published online

2009-05-13

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2009;68(3):174-178.

Keywords

superficial brachioradial artery
arteria brachioradialis
axillary artery
radial artery
anatomy
variant
median nerve

Authors

M. Konarik
J. Knize
V. Baca
D. Kachlik

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl