open access

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-04
Submitted: 2019-11-27
Accepted: 2020-05-26
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Reactivity of astrocytes in the periaqueductal gray matter of rats treated with monosodium glutamate

Aleksandra Krawczyk, Jadwiga Jaworska-Adamu
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0010
·
Pubmed: 32495938
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(2):147-155.

open access

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-04
Submitted: 2019-11-27
Accepted: 2020-05-26

Abstract

Introduction. The astrocytic S100b calcium-binding protein performs numerous intra- and extracellular functions, promoting the survival of central nervous system (CNS) structures. Its increased synthesis and release are a manifestation of reactive glial behavior, crucial for the maintenance of proper neuronal function, particularly under the pathological conditions. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is a mindbrain area composed of four parts dorsomedial (dm), dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l) and ventrolateral (vl)) which are involved in pain sensing and defensive reactions of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the S100b protein immunoreactive (S100b-IR) astrocytes in adult rats after administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Material and methods. The animals were administered the saline solution (group C), 2 g/kg b.w. MSG (group I) and 4 g/kg b.w. MSG (group II). The study was carried out on the brain sections stained by immunohistochemical peroxidase-antiperoxidase method with a primary mouse antibody against the S100b protein. Results. The analyses showed the presence of the S100b-immunoreactive cells in dm, dl, l, vl PAG of all animals. In the C and I group animals, the PAG astrocytes were characterized mainly by the presence of the studied protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell body. In the group II rats in all parts of PAG, the S100b-IR cells with numerous, thicker and branched processes were observed. A decrease in the number of the S100b-IR cells was found in dm, dl and l PAG in the MSG-treated animals, particularly with the larger dose. The number of cells with the S100b expression was comparable in vl PAG in all rats. Conclusions. MSG administered parenterally to the higher dose to adult rats affects the immunoreactivity of S100b protein in PAG. Phenotypic changes of the studied cells may indicate reactivity of glial cells and increased expression of the studied protein whereas a decrease in their number may result from the increased protein secretion into the extracellular space or cytotoxic death of glial cells.

Abstract

Introduction. The astrocytic S100b calcium-binding protein performs numerous intra- and extracellular functions, promoting the survival of central nervous system (CNS) structures. Its increased synthesis and release are a manifestation of reactive glial behavior, crucial for the maintenance of proper neuronal function, particularly under the pathological conditions. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is a mindbrain area composed of four parts dorsomedial (dm), dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l) and ventrolateral (vl)) which are involved in pain sensing and defensive reactions of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the S100b protein immunoreactive (S100b-IR) astrocytes in adult rats after administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Material and methods. The animals were administered the saline solution (group C), 2 g/kg b.w. MSG (group I) and 4 g/kg b.w. MSG (group II). The study was carried out on the brain sections stained by immunohistochemical peroxidase-antiperoxidase method with a primary mouse antibody against the S100b protein. Results. The analyses showed the presence of the S100b-immunoreactive cells in dm, dl, l, vl PAG of all animals. In the C and I group animals, the PAG astrocytes were characterized mainly by the presence of the studied protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell body. In the group II rats in all parts of PAG, the S100b-IR cells with numerous, thicker and branched processes were observed. A decrease in the number of the S100b-IR cells was found in dm, dl and l PAG in the MSG-treated animals, particularly with the larger dose. The number of cells with the S100b expression was comparable in vl PAG in all rats. Conclusions. MSG administered parenterally to the higher dose to adult rats affects the immunoreactivity of S100b protein in PAG. Phenotypic changes of the studied cells may indicate reactivity of glial cells and increased expression of the studied protein whereas a decrease in their number may result from the increased protein secretion into the extracellular space or cytotoxic death of glial cells.

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Keywords

rat; monosodium glutamate; periaqueductal gray matter; S100b; astrocytes

About this article
Title

Reactivity of astrocytes in the periaqueductal gray matter of rats treated with monosodium glutamate

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)

Pages

147-155

Published online

2020-06-04

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0010

Pubmed

32495938

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(2):147-155.

Keywords

rat
monosodium glutamate
periaqueductal gray matter
S100b
astrocytes

Authors

Aleksandra Krawczyk
Jadwiga Jaworska-Adamu

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