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Vol 58, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-02
Submitted: 2020-01-20
Accepted: 2020-05-09
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Immunocytochemical localization of tyrosine hydroxylase in the visual cortex of the microbat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum

Myung-Jun Lee, Kyung-Min Kwon, Won-Tae Lee, Gil-Hyun Kim, Chang-Jin Jeon
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0009
·
Pubmed: 32490536
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(2):61-72.

open access

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-02
Submitted: 2020-01-20
Accepted: 2020-05-09

Abstract

Introduction. In order to enhance our understanding of bat vision, we investigated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (IR) fibers in the visual cortex of the microbat.

Material and methods. The study was conducted on 12 freshly-caught adult bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum,
both sexes, weighing 15–20 g). We used standard immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy.

Results. TH-IR fibers were distributed throughout all layers of the visual cortex, with the highest density in layer I. Two types of TH-IR fibers were observed: small and large varicose fibers. TH-IR cells were not found in the microbat visual cortex. The microbat substantia nigra and ventral tegmental areas, previously identified sources of TH-IR fibers in the mammalian visual cortex, all contained strongly labeled TH-IR cells. The average diameters of TH-IR cells in the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental areas were 14.39 ± 0.13 μm (mean ± SEM) and 11.85 ± 0.13 μm, respectively.

Conclusions. Our results suggest that the microbat has a well-constructed neurochemical organization of THIR fibers. This observation should provide fundamental insights into a better understanding of the nocturnal, echolocating bat visual system.

Abstract

Introduction. In order to enhance our understanding of bat vision, we investigated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (IR) fibers in the visual cortex of the microbat.

Material and methods. The study was conducted on 12 freshly-caught adult bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum,
both sexes, weighing 15–20 g). We used standard immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy.

Results. TH-IR fibers were distributed throughout all layers of the visual cortex, with the highest density in layer I. Two types of TH-IR fibers were observed: small and large varicose fibers. TH-IR cells were not found in the microbat visual cortex. The microbat substantia nigra and ventral tegmental areas, previously identified sources of TH-IR fibers in the mammalian visual cortex, all contained strongly labeled TH-IR cells. The average diameters of TH-IR cells in the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental areas were 14.39 ± 0.13 μm (mean ± SEM) and 11.85 ± 0.13 μm, respectively.

Conclusions. Our results suggest that the microbat has a well-constructed neurochemical organization of THIR fibers. This observation should provide fundamental insights into a better understanding of the nocturnal, echolocating bat visual system.

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Keywords

visual cortex; tyrosine hydroxylase; microbat; immunocytochemistry

About this article
Title

Immunocytochemical localization of tyrosine hydroxylase in the visual cortex of the microbat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)

Pages

61-72

Published online

2020-06-02

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0009

Pubmed

32490536

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(2):61-72.

Keywords

visual cortex
tyrosine hydroxylase
microbat
immunocytochemistry

Authors

Myung-Jun Lee
Kyung-Min Kwon
Won-Tae Lee
Gil-Hyun Kim
Chang-Jin Jeon

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