open access

Vol 58, No 1 (2020)
Original paper
Published online: 2020-03-16
Submitted: 2019-11-28
Accepted: 2020-02-26
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Study of DNA topoisomerase IIa expression in canine lymphomas and its potential role as a marker of sensitivity to anthracycline-based chemotherapy in dogs

Pawel Klimiuk, Wojciech Lopuszynski, Kamila Bulak, Anna Smiech, Adam Brzana
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0004
·
Pubmed: 32176312
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(1):46-53.

open access

Vol 58, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-03-16
Submitted: 2019-11-28
Accepted: 2020-02-26

Abstract

Introduction. Canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive neoplasia in dogs. Many factors affect the prognosis in dogs treated for lymphoma, but indications for a specific treatment regimen in individual animals with lymphoma are poorly defined. Topoisomerase IIα (TOPIIα) is a key enzyme in DNA replication and a molecular target for TOPIIα inhibitors, including anthracyclines. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of TOPIIα in canine malignant lymphomas. The relationship between TOPIIα expression in canine lymphomas and potential sensitivity of neoplastic cells to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is discussed.

Materials and method. Samples of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 47 dogs with different subtypes of non-Hodgkin’s (34 B-cell and 13 T-cell) lymphoma were immunohistochemically labeled with anti-TOPIIα. The number of positive cells and the intensity of the reaction were taken into account in order to assess TOPIIα expression.

Results. TOPIIα expression was evident in all cases, although differences in the number of positive cells and intensity of the reaction were demonstrated between B-cell and T-cell lymphoma groups as well as within individual groups. Based on the established scoring system, in the B-cell lymphoma group statistically higher expression of TOPIIα was found compared to the T-cell lymphoma group (P = 0.006). In B-cell lymphoma group moderate (41.18%) and strong (32.35%) TOPIIα expression predominated, whereas among T-cell lymphoma group the majority were cases with a weak (46.15%) TOPIIα expression.

Conclusion. These preliminary results indicate that further studies are needed to determine the prognostic value of TOPIIα expression with regard to the sensitivity of canine B-cell lymphomas to anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimen. Nevertheless, this study indicates the possibility of choosing the appropriate treatment of canine lymphoma based on TOPIIa expression.

Abstract

Introduction. Canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive neoplasia in dogs. Many factors affect the prognosis in dogs treated for lymphoma, but indications for a specific treatment regimen in individual animals with lymphoma are poorly defined. Topoisomerase IIα (TOPIIα) is a key enzyme in DNA replication and a molecular target for TOPIIα inhibitors, including anthracyclines. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of TOPIIα in canine malignant lymphomas. The relationship between TOPIIα expression in canine lymphomas and potential sensitivity of neoplastic cells to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is discussed.

Materials and method. Samples of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 47 dogs with different subtypes of non-Hodgkin’s (34 B-cell and 13 T-cell) lymphoma were immunohistochemically labeled with anti-TOPIIα. The number of positive cells and the intensity of the reaction were taken into account in order to assess TOPIIα expression.

Results. TOPIIα expression was evident in all cases, although differences in the number of positive cells and intensity of the reaction were demonstrated between B-cell and T-cell lymphoma groups as well as within individual groups. Based on the established scoring system, in the B-cell lymphoma group statistically higher expression of TOPIIα was found compared to the T-cell lymphoma group (P = 0.006). In B-cell lymphoma group moderate (41.18%) and strong (32.35%) TOPIIα expression predominated, whereas among T-cell lymphoma group the majority were cases with a weak (46.15%) TOPIIα expression.

Conclusion. These preliminary results indicate that further studies are needed to determine the prognostic value of TOPIIα expression with regard to the sensitivity of canine B-cell lymphomas to anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimen. Nevertheless, this study indicates the possibility of choosing the appropriate treatment of canine lymphoma based on TOPIIa expression.

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Keywords

topoisomerase IIα; dog, lymphoma; immunohistochemistry; chemotherapy

About this article
Title

Study of DNA topoisomerase IIa expression in canine lymphomas and its potential role as a marker of sensitivity to anthracycline-based chemotherapy in dogs

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 1 (2020)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

46-53

Published online

2020-03-16

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0004

Pubmed

32176312

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(1):46-53.

Keywords

topoisomerase IIα
dog
lymphoma
immunohistochemistry
chemotherapy

Authors

Pawel Klimiuk
Wojciech Lopuszynski
Kamila Bulak
Anna Smiech
Adam Brzana

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