open access

Vol 57, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-06-24
Submitted: 2018-08-29
Accepted: 2019-06-19
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Gallbladder interstitial Cajal-like cells and gallbladder contractility in patients with cholelithiasis: a prospective study

Runyu Ding, Junmin Wei, Jingyong Xu
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2019.0011
·
Pubmed: 31237344
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2019;57(2):94-100.

open access

Vol 57, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-06-24
Submitted: 2018-08-29
Accepted: 2019-06-19

Abstract

Introduction. A reduced number of interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs) in the gallbladder have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of cholelithiasis. Therefore, this prospective study was conducted to investigate the relationship between gallbladder contractility and the number of gallbladder ICLCs in patients with cholelithiasis.

Material and methods. Patients admitted to the Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery for cholecystectomy were divided into the cholelithiasis (n = 18) and non-cholelithiasis (n = 8) groups based on their clinical data. Patients’ clinical data were collected on admission, and B-mode ultrasonography was performed to assess their gallbladder contractility. The resected gallbladder specimens were fixed, paraffin sections mounted on slides, and the immunofluorescence staining with the anti-human CD-117 and anti-human tryptase antibodies was performed to identify ICLSs and mast cells, respectively. The number of ICLCs was counted in 10 high-power fields (HPFs) randomly.

Results. Independent sample t-tests revealed differences between the cholelithiasis and non-cholelithiasis groups in the number of ICLCs (mean ± standard deviation: 88.61 ± 28.22 vs. 115.89 ± 27.87 per HPFs, P = 0.032) and gallbladder contractility (43.94% ± 18.50% vs. 61.00% ± 20.50%, P = 0.046). Pearson and Spearman cor­relation analyses revealed no significant correlation between the number of ICLCs and gallbladder contractility.

Conclusion. The results suggest that the number of gallbladder ICLCs in the wall of the gallbladder of patients with or without cholelithiasis is not a decisive factor affecting gallbladder contractility.

Abstract

Introduction. A reduced number of interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs) in the gallbladder have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of cholelithiasis. Therefore, this prospective study was conducted to investigate the relationship between gallbladder contractility and the number of gallbladder ICLCs in patients with cholelithiasis.

Material and methods. Patients admitted to the Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery for cholecystectomy were divided into the cholelithiasis (n = 18) and non-cholelithiasis (n = 8) groups based on their clinical data. Patients’ clinical data were collected on admission, and B-mode ultrasonography was performed to assess their gallbladder contractility. The resected gallbladder specimens were fixed, paraffin sections mounted on slides, and the immunofluorescence staining with the anti-human CD-117 and anti-human tryptase antibodies was performed to identify ICLSs and mast cells, respectively. The number of ICLCs was counted in 10 high-power fields (HPFs) randomly.

Results. Independent sample t-tests revealed differences between the cholelithiasis and non-cholelithiasis groups in the number of ICLCs (mean ± standard deviation: 88.61 ± 28.22 vs. 115.89 ± 27.87 per HPFs, P = 0.032) and gallbladder contractility (43.94% ± 18.50% vs. 61.00% ± 20.50%, P = 0.046). Pearson and Spearman cor­relation analyses revealed no significant correlation between the number of ICLCs and gallbladder contractility.

Conclusion. The results suggest that the number of gallbladder ICLCs in the wall of the gallbladder of patients with or without cholelithiasis is not a decisive factor affecting gallbladder contractility.

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Keywords

cholelithiasis; interstitial Cajal-like cells; mast cells; gallbladder contractility; immunofluorescence; ultrasonography

About this article
Title

Gallbladder interstitial Cajal-like cells and gallbladder contractility in patients with cholelithiasis: a prospective study

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 57, No 2 (2019)

Pages

94-100

Published online

2019-06-24

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2019.0011

Pubmed

31237344

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2019;57(2):94-100.

Keywords

cholelithiasis
interstitial Cajal-like cells
mast cells
gallbladder contractility
immunofluorescence
ultrasonography

Authors

Runyu Ding
Junmin Wei
Jingyong Xu

References (20)
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