open access

Vol 57, No 4 (2019)
Commentary
Submitted: 2019-10-28
Accepted: 2019-10-28
Published online: 2019-11-19
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Transforming growth factor-β activation in cell-free extracellular matrix preparations. Commentary

John R. Couchman1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2019.0017
·
Pubmed: 31743418
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2019;57(4):157-158.
Affiliations
  1. Biotech Research & Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

open access

Vol 57, No 4 (2019)
COMMENTARY
Submitted: 2019-10-28
Accepted: 2019-10-28
Published online: 2019-11-19

Abstract

Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is an important regulator of many cellular and immunological functions. It is often deposited in extracellular matrices in a latent form. This commentary is to draw attention to the likelihood that preparing cell-free matrices from tissue cultures by high pH buffers, such as ammonium hydroxide, can activate the TGF-β. Therefore, cells subsequently seeded onto such matrices may respond to the presence of active TGF-β in addition to interactions with macromolecular extracellular matrix components.

Abstract

Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is an important regulator of many cellular and immunological functions. It is often deposited in extracellular matrices in a latent form. This commentary is to draw attention to the likelihood that preparing cell-free matrices from tissue cultures by high pH buffers, such as ammonium hydroxide, can activate the TGF-β. Therefore, cells subsequently seeded onto such matrices may respond to the presence of active TGF-β in addition to interactions with macromolecular extracellular matrix components.

Get Citation

Keywords

TGF-β; latent TGF-binding protein; cell free ECM; high pH buffers

About this article
Title

Transforming growth factor-β activation in cell-free extracellular matrix preparations. Commentary

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 57, No 4 (2019)

Article type

Commentary

Pages

157-158

Published online

2019-11-19

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2019.0017

Pubmed

31743418

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2019;57(4):157-158.

Keywords

TGF-β
latent TGF-binding protein
cell free ECM
high pH buffers

Authors

John R. Couchman

References (17)
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