open access

Vol 56, No 4 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2018-07-05
Accepted: 2018-11-20
Published online: 2018-12-20
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Immunohistochemical characteristic of C cells in European bison thyroid gland

Justyna Sokolowska1, Joanna Berczynska2, Aleksandra Poweska1, Dorota Rygiel1, Katarzyna Olbrych1, Kaja Urbanska1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0024
·
Pubmed: 30565206
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(4):222-230.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Morphological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
  2. Departament of Small Animal Diseases with Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159c,, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 56, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2018-07-05
Accepted: 2018-11-20
Published online: 2018-12-20

Abstract

Introduction. C cells constitute a small percentage of thyroid gland parenchyma. The number, morphology and distribution of C cells differ among species; however, data regarding their characteristics in European bison are sparse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology, distribution pattern and percentage of C cells in European bison thyroid gland together with morphometric analysis.
Material and methods. Thyroid glands from 28 European bisons of different sex and age were collected either in autumn-winter (13/28) or in spring-summer (15/28) periods and analyzed by immunohistochemistry.
Results. The mean total C cell number per all endocrine (follicular and C cells) cell number (C cell concentration) was 7.33%. The tendency to increase the C cell number from periphery to the central region of thyroid lobe was observed with the mean C cell concentration of 3.95%, 7.89% and 9.97% in peripheral, intermediate and central areas, respectively. Most frequently, C cells were situated intrafolliculary whereas epifollicular and interfollicular positions were observed less often. C cells were polymorphic with long cytoplasmic processes. The mean C cell area was 61.97 μm2 and the mean C cell perimeter, length and width were: 34.92 μm, 12.85 μm and 4.91 μm, respectively. In the majority of C cells, strong immunohistochemical cytoplasmic reaction was observed with the mean color intensity of 78.32. In autumn-winter period, C cells were significantly larger with lower color intensity than during spring and summer.
Conclusions. This study leads to deeper characteristics of thyroid gland C cells in European bison. The histomorphometric data suggest that in European bison production of calcitonin by C cells may differ depending on the time of the year.

Abstract

Introduction. C cells constitute a small percentage of thyroid gland parenchyma. The number, morphology and distribution of C cells differ among species; however, data regarding their characteristics in European bison are sparse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology, distribution pattern and percentage of C cells in European bison thyroid gland together with morphometric analysis.
Material and methods. Thyroid glands from 28 European bisons of different sex and age were collected either in autumn-winter (13/28) or in spring-summer (15/28) periods and analyzed by immunohistochemistry.
Results. The mean total C cell number per all endocrine (follicular and C cells) cell number (C cell concentration) was 7.33%. The tendency to increase the C cell number from periphery to the central region of thyroid lobe was observed with the mean C cell concentration of 3.95%, 7.89% and 9.97% in peripheral, intermediate and central areas, respectively. Most frequently, C cells were situated intrafolliculary whereas epifollicular and interfollicular positions were observed less often. C cells were polymorphic with long cytoplasmic processes. The mean C cell area was 61.97 μm2 and the mean C cell perimeter, length and width were: 34.92 μm, 12.85 μm and 4.91 μm, respectively. In the majority of C cells, strong immunohistochemical cytoplasmic reaction was observed with the mean color intensity of 78.32. In autumn-winter period, C cells were significantly larger with lower color intensity than during spring and summer.
Conclusions. This study leads to deeper characteristics of thyroid gland C cells in European bison. The histomorphometric data suggest that in European bison production of calcitonin by C cells may differ depending on the time of the year.

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Keywords

C cells; European bison; histology; immunohistochemistry; morphometry; thyroid gland

About this article
Title

Immunohistochemical characteristic of C cells in European bison thyroid gland

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

222-230

Published online

2018-12-20

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0024

Pubmed

30565206

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(4):222-230.

Keywords

C cells
European bison
histology
immunohistochemistry
morphometry
thyroid gland

Authors

Justyna Sokolowska
Joanna Berczynska
Aleksandra Poweska
Dorota Rygiel
Katarzyna Olbrych
Kaja Urbanska

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