open access

Vol 45, Supp. I (2007)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2008-04-15
Submitted: 2011-12-19
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Flow cytometry application in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity of men with asthenozoospermia.

M Piasecka, D Gaczarzewicz, M Laszczyńska, A Starczewski, A Brodowska

open access

Vol 45, Supp. I (2007)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2008-04-15
Submitted: 2011-12-19

Abstract

Sperm genomic integrity and ultrastructural features of ejaculated spermatozoa contributing to the assessment of gamete fertility potential in patients with asthenozoospermia are discussed. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in the semen of patients with low sperm motility (n=40; p<0.01) as compared to men with normal sperm motility (n=54). Sperm DNA fragmentation negatively correlated (n=94) with sperm motility, sperm concentration, and integrity of the sperm cellular membrane (HOS-test). Two categories of patients were distinguished: (1) patients (23 out of 94 subjects) with < or = 4% of TUNEL-positive cells and (2) patients (71 subjects) with 4% of TUNEL-positive cells. A significant difference was noted in the sperm motility and HOS-test results between patients from both groups. Large numbers of immature spermatozoa with extensive cytoplasmic retention, ultrastructural chromatin and midpiece abnormalities, and conglomerates containing sperm fragments were present more frequently in the semen of asthenozoospermic subjects with >4% of TUNEL-positive sperm cells. Low sperm motility seems to be accompanied by serious defects of gamete chromatin expressed as diminished sperm genomic integrity and abnormal DNA condensation and by defects of sperm midpiece. These abnormalities may reflect developmental failure during the spermatogenic remodeling process. The DNA fragmentation test may be considered as an additional assay for the evaluation of spermatozoa beside standard analysis and taken together with electron microscopy may help to determine the actual number of "healthy" spermatozoa thereby playing an important role during diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

Abstract

Sperm genomic integrity and ultrastructural features of ejaculated spermatozoa contributing to the assessment of gamete fertility potential in patients with asthenozoospermia are discussed. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in the semen of patients with low sperm motility (n=40; p<0.01) as compared to men with normal sperm motility (n=54). Sperm DNA fragmentation negatively correlated (n=94) with sperm motility, sperm concentration, and integrity of the sperm cellular membrane (HOS-test). Two categories of patients were distinguished: (1) patients (23 out of 94 subjects) with < or = 4% of TUNEL-positive cells and (2) patients (71 subjects) with 4% of TUNEL-positive cells. A significant difference was noted in the sperm motility and HOS-test results between patients from both groups. Large numbers of immature spermatozoa with extensive cytoplasmic retention, ultrastructural chromatin and midpiece abnormalities, and conglomerates containing sperm fragments were present more frequently in the semen of asthenozoospermic subjects with >4% of TUNEL-positive sperm cells. Low sperm motility seems to be accompanied by serious defects of gamete chromatin expressed as diminished sperm genomic integrity and abnormal DNA condensation and by defects of sperm midpiece. These abnormalities may reflect developmental failure during the spermatogenic remodeling process. The DNA fragmentation test may be considered as an additional assay for the evaluation of spermatozoa beside standard analysis and taken together with electron microscopy may help to determine the actual number of "healthy" spermatozoa thereby playing an important role during diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.
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About this article
Title

Flow cytometry application in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity of men with asthenozoospermia.

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 45, Supp. I (2007)

Pages

127-136

Published online

2008-04-15

Authors

M Piasecka
D Gaczarzewicz
M Laszczyńska
A Starczewski
A Brodowska

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