open access

Vol 48, No 4 (2010)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2011-04-12
Submitted: 2011-12-19
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Influence of thrombophlebitis on TGF-β1 and its signaling pathway in the vein wall.

Radoslaw Kowalewski, Andrzej Malkowski, Marek Gacko, Krzysztof Sobolewski
DOI: 10.2478/v10042-010-0041-z
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2010;48(4):542-548.

open access

Vol 48, No 4 (2010)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2011-04-12
Submitted: 2011-12-19

Abstract

Extensive extracellular matrix remodeling of the vein wall is involved in varicose veins pathogenesis. This process is controlled by numerous factors, including peptide growth factors. The aim of the study was to evaluate influence of thrombophlebitis on TGF-β1 and its signaling pathway in the vein wall. TGF-β1 mRNAlevels, growth factor content and its expression were evaluated by RT-PCR, ELISA, and western blot methods, respectively, in the walls of normal veins, varicose veins and varicose veins complicated by thrombophlebitis. Western blot analysis was used to assess TGF-β receptor type II (TGF-β RII) and p-Smad2/3 protein expression in the investigated material. Unchanged mRNA levels of TGF-β1, decreased TGF-β1 content, as well as decreased expression of latent and active forms of TGF-β1 were found in varicose veins. Increased expression of TGF-β RII and p-Smad2/3 were found in varicose veins. Thrombophlebitis led to increased protein expression of the TGF-β1 active form and p-Smad2/3 in the vein wall compared to varicose veins. TGF-β1 may play a role in the disease pathogenesis because of increased expression and activation of its receptor in the wall of varicose veins. Thrombophlebitis accelerates activation of TGF-β1 and activity of its receptor in the varicose vein wall.

Abstract

Extensive extracellular matrix remodeling of the vein wall is involved in varicose veins pathogenesis. This process is controlled by numerous factors, including peptide growth factors. The aim of the study was to evaluate influence of thrombophlebitis on TGF-β1 and its signaling pathway in the vein wall. TGF-β1 mRNAlevels, growth factor content and its expression were evaluated by RT-PCR, ELISA, and western blot methods, respectively, in the walls of normal veins, varicose veins and varicose veins complicated by thrombophlebitis. Western blot analysis was used to assess TGF-β receptor type II (TGF-β RII) and p-Smad2/3 protein expression in the investigated material. Unchanged mRNA levels of TGF-β1, decreased TGF-β1 content, as well as decreased expression of latent and active forms of TGF-β1 were found in varicose veins. Increased expression of TGF-β RII and p-Smad2/3 were found in varicose veins. Thrombophlebitis led to increased protein expression of the TGF-β1 active form and p-Smad2/3 in the vein wall compared to varicose veins. TGF-β1 may play a role in the disease pathogenesis because of increased expression and activation of its receptor in the wall of varicose veins. Thrombophlebitis accelerates activation of TGF-β1 and activity of its receptor in the varicose vein wall.
Get Citation
About this article
Title

Influence of thrombophlebitis on TGF-β1 and its signaling pathway in the vein wall.

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 48, No 4 (2010)

Pages

542-548

Published online

2011-04-12

DOI

10.2478/v10042-010-0041-z

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2010;48(4):542-548.

Authors

Radoslaw Kowalewski
Andrzej Malkowski
Marek Gacko
Krzysztof Sobolewski

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