_01_FC_PO_Praska

PRACA ORYGINALNA

Clinical characteristic of 100 patients from pilot registry of heart failure patients hospitalized in the district hospital in Poland

Charakterystyka kliniczna 100 pacjentów pilotażowego rejestru chorych z niewydolnością serca hospitalizowanych w szpitalu powiatowym w Polsce

Anna Praska-Ogińska, Janusz Bednarski

Department of Cardiology, John Paul II Western Hospital in Grodzisk Mazowiecki, Poland

Address for correspondence: lek. Anna Praska-Ogińska, Oddział Kardiologiczny, Specjalistyczny Szpital Zachodni im. św. Jana Pawła II, ul. Daleka 11, 05–825 Grodzisk Mazowiecki, Poland, e-mail: a.praskaoginska@gmail.com

Abstract

Introduction. Nowadays heart failure (HF) presents an enormous and rapidly growing public health problem. HF is characterized by high morbidity and mortality and high costs.

Material and methods. The analysis included medical records of 100 consecutive patients with HF treated in the Department of Cardiology during the first quarter of 2015.

Results. The mean age of the whole investigated population was 73 years (63% males). The most prevalent concomitant diseases were: arterial hypertension (58%), coronary artery disease (46%), the presence of moderate or severe mitral or aortic valvular defect (34%), atrial fibrillation (38%), and diabetes mellitus (29%).

Conclusions. Data from hospitalized HF registries are useful to better understand the clinical characteristics, patient management and outcomes after discharge.

Key words: heart failure, hospitalization, registry

Folia Cardiologica 2017; 12, 4: 337–341

Introduction

Heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem. It is estimated that the prevalence of HF is 1–2% in the general population and as high as 10% in patients over 70 years of age [1]. Rapid increase in the number of patients with HF is a consequence of both the aging of society and the development of interventional cardiology and electrotherapy. Currently, the most common causes of HF are ischemic heart disease and hypertension. HF is associated with very poor prognosis and 5-year survival rates are worse than for most cancers [2].

The aim of this study was to present the clinical profile of patients hospitalized for heart failure in the cardiology department of a multi-specialty district hospital in Poland.

Material and methods

Medical records of 10,925 patients hospitalized at the Western Hospital in Grodzisk Mazowiecki, Poland in the first quarter of 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Of this group, the authors selected medical records of 100 consecutive patients hospitalized in the cardiology department in whom HF was indicated in the hospital discharge summary as a primary diagnosis.

Clinical characteristics of patients

Among the selected patients, the median age was 73 years. In this population, males accounted for 63% of the patients, were younger and had lower comorbidity burden compared with hospitalized women. Nearly one third of the patients were admitted in an urgent mode based on the decision by the Emergency Medical Service team; 64% of the patients reported the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III or IV symptoms at admission. The most common concomitant disease was hypertension, which affected 64% of the patients. Supraventricular arrhythmias, i.e. atrial fibrillation or flutter, occurred in 38% of the patients, and 46% had coronary artery disease. The most common valvular heart defect was mitral regurgitation, which was almost 6 times more frequent than aortic stenosis (mild valvular heart defects in echocardiographic evaluation were disregarded). Mean levels of N-terminal B-type natriuretic propeptide (NT-proBNP) and sodium were 4819 ± 6968 pg/mL and 138 ± 4 mmol/L, accordingly. Most patients had impaired renal function, defined as glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 50 mL/min/1.73 m2, and 17% had stage 4/5 chronic renal disease. Thirty-one percent of the patients had left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 50%. Forty-two percent of the patients had left ventricular systolic dysfunction of various degrees, of which 2/3 had an LVEF less than 40%. Twenty-eight percent of the patients did not undergo echocardiographic evaluation of LVEF during hospitalization (Table 1).

Table 1. Clinical characteristics of patients

Parameter

Value

Age

73 years

Male

63%

Mode of admission to hospital:

  • arrival by ambulance
  • own or public transport

28%

72%

Symptoms in III/IV NYHA class

68%

Hypertension

58%

History of myocardial infarction

PCI

CABG

24%

18%

4%

AF/AFL

38%

Mitral insufficiency

Aortal stenosis

29%

5%

COPD

16%

Type 2 diabetes

29%

Pacemaker

2%

ICD

7%

CRT

3%

Stroke/TIA

7%

BMI [kg/m2]:

  • < 18.5
  • 18.5–24.99
  • 25–29.99
  • ≥ 30

20%

10%

33%

35%

NT-proBNP [pg/mL]

4819

Hb [g/dL]

12.79

Na [mmol/L]

137.7

GFR [mL/min/1.73 m2]:

  • < 30
  • 30–49
  • > 50

17%

71%

12%

LVEF:

  • < 40%
  • 40–49%
  • ≥ 50%

27%

15%

31%

NYHA — New York Heart Association; PCI — percutaneous coronary intervention; CABG — coronary artery bypass grafting; AF — atrial fibrillation; AFL — atrial flutter; COPD — chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; ICD — implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; CRT — cardiac resynchronization therapy; TIA — transient ischemic attack; BMI — body mass index; NT-proBNP — N-terminal B-type natriuretic propeptide; Hb — hemoglobin; Na — sodium; GFR — glomerular filtration rate; LVEF — left ventricular ejection fraction

Discussion

It is estimated that the number of patients with HF in Poland is 600–700 thousand and that every fifth person will develop HF at some point of his/her life [2]. Medical care for patients with HF both in outpatient setting and during frequent hospitalizations due to HF exacerbation, which are typical of the natural course of the disease, cause considerable social and financial burden.

Our analysis included patients hospitalized in the cardiology department of a multi-specialty district hospital, where there is also a department of internal diseases. The decision about the destination of the patient (a department of cardiology vs. department of internal diseases) is taken during his/her stay at the Hospital Emergency Department, usually after prior cardiac consultation. This allows for identification of patients who require specialist treatment (Table 2).

Table 2. Data from heart failure registries

Registry

Western Hospital

Gulf-CARE

ADHERE

EHFS II

OPTIMIZE-HF

IN-HF

ATTEND

BIO-HF

ESC HF Pilot

PL ESC-HF

EFICA

Number of patients

100

5005

105,388

3580

48,612

1520

1110

904

1892

1159

599

Duration

2015

2012

2002–2004

2005

2003–2004

2007–2009

2007–2012

2008–2015

2009–2010

2009–2010

2001

Age (years)

73

59

72

70

73

72

73

77

69

69

73

Males [%]

63

63

48

61

48

60

59

66

63

65

59

Symptoms in III/IV NYHA class [%]

68

76

ND

ND

ND

65

ND

100

45

62

31

Hypertension [%]

58

61

74

63

71

64

71

62

62

ND

60

History of myocardial infarction [%]

24

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

58

22

PCI [%]

18

7

ND

10.2

27.2

ND

ND

ND

ND

34 (with CABG)

33 (with CABG)

CABG [%]

4

1

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

AF/AFL [%]

38

14

30

39

41

39

40

48

43

38.3

25

Mitral insufficiency [%]

29

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

Aortal stenosis [%]

5

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

COPD [%]

16

ND

29

19

28

31

9

17

15

13

ND

Type 2 diabetes [%]

29

50

44

33

41

41

34

27

35

34

27

Pacemaker [%]

2

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

9

8

7

ND

ICD [%]

7

ND

ND

ND

ND

14

ND

2

ND

9

ND

CRT [%]

3

ND

ND

ND

ND

5

ND

1

6

4

ND

Stroke/TIA [%]

7

8.1

17

13

16

9

12

11

3.3

9.7

ND

NT-proBNP [pg/mL]

4819

1300

843

ND

1273

ND

1063

6500

400

ND

ND

Hb [g/dL]

12.8

12.6

12.6

ND

ND

12,6

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

Na [mmol/L]

138

138

ND

ND

ND

142

138

138

ND

138

ND

HFpEF [%]

46

31

46

34.3

51

53

57

ND

65

ND

ND

HFrEF [%]

27

NYHA — New York Heart Association; PCI — percutaneous coronary intervention; CABG — coronary artery bypass grafting; AF — atrial fibrillation; AFL — atrial flutter; ND — no data; COPD — chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; ICD — implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; CRT — cardiac resynchronization therapy; TIA — transient ischemic attack; NT-proBNP — N-terminal B-type natriuretic propeptide; Hb — hemoglobin; Na — sodium; HFpEF — heart failure with preserved ejection fraction; HFrEF — heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

The mean age of patients hospitalized due to HF in Poland is consistent with the age of patients participating in large registry trials in developed countries such as Japan (ATTEND) [3], France (EFICA) [4] or USA (ADHERE [5], OPTIMIZE-HF [6]).

As in most European registries, such as ESC-HF Pilot [7], EHFS II [8], IN-HF [9], also in our study the majority of hospitalized patients (63%) were males. Women are traditionally less represented, not only in randomized clinical trials on HF but also in hospital registries. There is, however, one exception — available data indicate higher proportion of women requiring hospitalization due to HF only in the United States, which is contrary not only to data obtained in Europe but also in other regions of the world.

It is also worth noting that, as shown in the Western Hospital registry, women at the time of diagnosis of HF were older than men and were more likely to have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).

The lower prevalence of coronary heart disease observed in our study (46% vs 50–57% in other registries) may be due to a slightly different questionnaire developed to describe a population in which coronary artery disease was diagnosed solely based on a history of myocardial infarction, prior coronary revascularization or coronary angiography. However, when taking into account the proportion of patients with HF and a history of myocardial infarction, the differences are much lower — 24% vs. 22% in the French registry or 31% in the US registry.

The prevalence of hypertension at 58% is similar to data from all European registries. The exception is again American population, where hypertension is present in about 75% of people. This is obviously related to a higher prevalence of obesity in US society compared to Western Europe or Poland.

A similar pattern is observed regarding the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Its frequency, due to the epidemic of obesity, is markedly higher in the US (40–44%) compared with the Polish population presented in our study (29%) or the French registry (27%).As showed by all registries, atrial fibrillation affects about 38–40% of patients hospitalized due to HF and is, along with hypertension, the major comorbid condition accompanying HFpEF.

It is also worth noting that the proportion of HFpEF patients hospitalized in recent years has gradually increased. Since many hospital records do not show LVEF values, we still do not have reliable epidemiological data on the actual HfrEF/HFpEF ratio.It seems, however, that this percentage can reach as much as 60–65% of hospitalized patients, which is also confirmed by the presented registry.

Data concerning the occurrence of comorbid conditions, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are also comparable between various HF registries. For example, the prevalence of CKD with GFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 is 17% in the presented registry vs 20% in global registries [12]. The prevalence of COPD (16%) is consistent with both OPTIMIZE-HF (15%) [6] and European EHFS II (19%) [8].

Conclusions

New registry trials have been emerging over recent years. The data collected in these databases provide an excellent source of information both for the medical professionals and for healthcare system managers. Cardiovascular societies continuously update the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HF – both considering the results of clinical trials, in which the patient population is selected and unrealistic due to strict criteria for inclusion and exclusion, and analyzing clinical practice based on registry data. The study presented above proves that the clinical profile of Polish patients is very similar to that of patients in developed countries. For a practitioner, this means that recommendations in the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology can and should be directly implemented in the treatment of Polish patients.

Conflict of interest(s)

None declared.

Streszczenie

Wstęp. Niewydolność serca (HF) stanowi poważny problem współczesnej medycyny. Choroba charakteryzuje się wysoką śmiertelnością, a rosnąca liczba chorych pociąga za sobą wysokie koszty ochrony zdrowia.

Materiał i metody. W niniejszej pracy oceniono profil kliniczny 100 pacjentów hospitalizowanych w pierwszym kwartale 2015 roku na oddziale kardiologicznym szpitala powiatowego.

Wyniki. Średni wiek chorych wynosił 73 lata (63% mężczyzn). Najczęstszymi chorobami towarzyszącymi były: nadciśnienie tętnicze (58%), choroba wieńcowa (46%), umiarkowana wada mitralna lub aortalna (34%), migotanie przedsionków (38%), cukrzyca (29%).

Wnioski. Dane z rejestrów są pomocne zarówno dla środowiska lekarskiego, jak i zarządzających służbą zdrowia.

Słowa kluczowe: niewydolność serca, hospitalizacja, rejestr

Folia Cardiologica 2017; 12, 4: 337–341

References

  1. 1. Ponikowski P, Voors A, Anker S, et al. Wytyczne ESC dotyczące diagnostyki i leczenia ostrej i przewlekłej niewydolności serca w 2016 roku. Kardiol Pol. 2016; 74(10): 1037–1147, doi: 10.5603/kp.2016.0141.
  2. 2. Sekcja Niewydolności Serca PTK. Niewydolność serca w Polsce — raport 2016. http://www.niewydolnosc-serca.pl/barometr.pdf (20.01.2017).
  3. 3. Sato N, Kajimoto K, Asai K, et al. ATTEND Investigators. Acute decompensated heart failure syndromes (ATTEND) registry. A prospective observational multicenter cohort study: rationale, design, and preliminary data. Am Heart J. 2010; 159(6): 949–955.e1, doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2010.03.019, indexed in Pubmed: 20569705.
  4. 4. Zannad F, Mebazaa A, Juillière Y, et al. EFICA Investigators. Clinical profile, contemporary management and one-year mortality in patients with severe acute heart failure syndromes: The EFICA study. Eur J Heart Fail. 2006; 8(7): 697–705, doi: 10.1016/j.ejheart.2006.01.001, indexed in Pubmed: 16516552.
  5. 5. Fonarow GC, Heywood JT, Heidenreich PA, et al. ADHERE Scientific Advisory Committee and Investigators. Temporal trends in clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes for heart failure hospitalizations, 2002 to 2004: findings from Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE). Am Heart J. 2007; 153(6): 1021–1028, doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2007.03.012, indexed in Pubmed: 17540205.
  6. 6. Gheorghiade M, Abraham WT, Albert NM, et al. OPTIMIZE-HF Investigators and Coordinators. Systolic blood pressure at admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure. JAMA. 2006; 296(18): 2217–2226, doi: 10.1001/jama.296.18.2217, indexed in Pubmed: 17090768.
  7. 7. Balsam P, Tymińska A, Kapłon-Cieślicka A, et al. Predictors of one-year outcome in patients hospitalised for heart failure: results from the Polish part of the Heart Failure Pilot Survey of the European Society of Cardiology. Kardiol Pol. 2016; 74(1): 9–17, doi: 10.5603/KP.a2015.0112, indexed in Pubmed: 26101021.
  8. 8. Nieminen MS, Brutsaert D, Dickstein K, et al. EuroHeart Survey Investigators, Heart Failure Association, European Society of Cardiology. EuroHeart Failure Survey II (EHFS II): a survey on hospitalized acute heart failure patients: description of population. Eur Heart J. 2006; 27(22): 2725–2736, doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehl193, indexed in Pub­med: 17000631.
  9. 9. Di Tano G, De Maria R, Gonzini L, et al. IN-HF Outcome Investigators. The 30-day metric in acute heart failure revisited: data from IN-HF Outcome, an Italian nationwide cardiology registry. Eur J Heart Fail. 2015; 17(10): 1032–1041, doi: 10.1002/ejhf.290, indexed in Pub­med: 26018852.
  10. 10. De Sutter J, Pardaens S, Audenaert T, et al. Clinical characteristics and short-term outcome of patients admitted with heart failure in Belgium: results from the BIO-HF registry. Acta Cardiol. 2015; 70(4): 375–385, indexed in Pubmed: 26455238.
  11. 11. Panduranga P, Sulaiman K, Al-Zakwani I, et al. Clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of acute heart failure patients: observations from the Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Eur J Heart Fail. 2015; 17(4): 374–384, doi: 10.1002/ejhf.245, indexed in Pubmed: 25739882.
  12. 12. Ambrosy AP, Fonarow GC, Butler J, et al. The global health and economic burden of hospitalizations for heart failure: lessons learned from hospitalized heart failure registries. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014; 63(12): 1123–1133, doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.11.053, indexed in Pubmed: 24491689.

Komentarz

Autorzy, Anna Praska-Ogińska i Janusz Bednarski, poruszyli bardzo ważny temat niewydolności serca (HF, heart failure) z poziomu szpitala powiatowego. Organizacja opieki nad pacjentem z HF w Polsce powoduje, że większość chorych trafia właśnie do tego poziomu referencyjności oddziałów, zazwyczaj częściej na oddział internistyczny niż kardiologiczny.

Dane Narodowego Funduszu Zdrowia (NFZ) z 2012 roku wskazują, że HF jest najczęstszym powodem hospitalizacji w polskiej populacji osób po 65. roku życia [1]. Częstość hospitalizacji w Polsce jest 2-krotnie wyższa niż w krajach Organizacji Współpracy Gospodarczej i Rozwoju (OECD, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) i 5-krotnie wyższa niż w Wielkiej Brytanii [2]. Wskaźniki hospitalizacji pacjentów z HF w Polsce należą do najwyższych w Europie i wynoszą 547/100 tys. mieszkańców, a hospitalizacje z powodu HF pochłaniają około 94% budżetu przeznaczonego na leczenie HF [3]. Istotnym problemem są powtarzające się hospitalizacje [4]. Postęp leczenia — głównie w zakresie elektroterapii — spowodował, że pacjenci z HF obecnie żyją dłużej, jednak mimo leczenia progresja choroby wiąże się z zaostrzeniami i prowadzi do obrazu pump failure. Dlatego tak ważne jest wczesne rozpoznanie i optymalne leczenie HF lekami o udowodnionej skuteczności w zakresie poprawy rokowania i zmniejszenia zachorowalności.

Autorzy pracy porównali uzyskane dane z charakterystyki klinicznej do danych z krajów europejskich oraz ze Stanów Zjednoczonych, wskazując na podobieństwa i różnice populacji hospitalizowanej z powodu HF. Warto przytoczyć dane z rejestru QUALIFY (Quality of adherence to guideline recommendations for live-saving treatment in heart failure: an international survey) [5], mimo że obejmował on chorych ambulatoryjnych, ale z wywiadem hospitalizacji z powodu zaostrzenia HF w okresie ostatnich 1–15 miesięcy. W rejestrze tym analizowano przestrzeganie wytycznych w czasie zbliżonym do tego, w którym zbierano dane do przedstawianej pracy. Średni wiek chorych tej pracy jest wyższy niż w populacji polskiej w rejestrze QUALIFY [6] — średnia wieku, odpowiednio, 73 w porównaniu z 67 latami, z niższym odsetkiem mężczyzn (63% v. 77%). Opisana populacja, podobnie jak w rejestrach europejskich, jest obciążona chorobami współistniejącymi — najczęściej nadciśnieniem tętniczym (58%), chorobą wieńcową (24%), migotaniem przedsionków (38%) oraz cukrzycą (29%). Częściej występowała przewlekła choroba nerek z filtracją kłębuszkową (GFR, glomerular filtration rate) poniżej 50 ml/min/1,73 m2 (88%), co może się wiązać ze starszym wiekiem chorych. Natomiast GFR poniżej 30 ml/min/1,73 m2 w niniejszym rejestrze stwierdzono u 17% chorych, co jest porównywalne z danymi z rejestrów światowych. Stężenie N-końcowego fragmentu propeptydu natriuretycznego typu B (NT-proBNP, N-terminal B-type natriuretic propeptide) było wysokie (średnio 4819 pg/ml); 28% chorych zostało przyjętych w trybie pilnym.

W porównaniu z rejestrem QUALIFY niższy był odsetek chorych z urządzeniami wszczepialnymi, wynosząc — odpowiednio — 9,7% w porównaniu z 7% w odniesieniu do wszczepialnych kardiowerterów-defibrylatorów (ICD, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator) oraz 9% w porównaniu z 3% w przypadku terapii resynchronizującej (CRT, cardiac resynchronization therapy). Wskazuje to na nadal duże niezaspokojone potrzeby w zakresie elektroterapii.

W przedstawianej pracy profil kliniczny polskich chorych jest podobny do profilu pacjentów krajów wysokorozwiniętych oraz większości chorych z rejestrów europejskich. Dla lekarza praktyka oznacza to, że zalecenia zawarte w wytycznych Europejskiego Towarzystwa Kardiologicznego (ESC, European Society of Cardiology) należy bezpośrednio implementować polskim chorym.

W ocenianej populacji u 42% stwierdzono obniżoną frakcję wyrzutową (EF, ejection fraction) lewej komory (EF < 50%), blisko 1/3 populacji miała dysfunkcję skurczową lewej komory z EF poniżej 40%. Mimo wszystko zaskakujący jest fakt, że aż u 28% chorych nie wykonano oceny echokardiograficznej w trakcie hospitalizacji, choć dane pochodzą z oddziału kardiologii. Zgodnie z aktualnymi wytycznymi ESC dotyczącymi HF ocena echokardiograficzna jest niezbędna do ustalenia rozpoznania HF z udokumentowaniem wartości EF lewej komory oraz zmian strukturalnych, takich jak przerost lewej komory/powiększenie lewego przedsionka i/lub cech upośledzenia funkcji rozkurczowej [7].

Autorzy nie przeanalizowali stosowanej terapii ani dawek leków — szkoda, ponieważ zjawisko adherence jest dużym problemem, co przekłada się na rokowanie tej populacji. Zwrócili natomiast uwagę na stopniowo się zwiększający odsetek chorych z HF z zachowaną EF (HFpEF, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction) hospitalizowanych w ostatnich latach z powodu HF. W związku z tym, że w znacznej części rejestrów szpitalnych nie podaje się wartości EF, wciąż nie ma rzetelnych danych epidemiologicznych na temat rzeczywistych proporcji HFpEF do HF z obniżoną EF (HFrEF, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction). Wydaje się jednak, co potwierdza prezentowany rejestr, że odsetek ten może sięgać nawet 60–65% hospitalizowanych pacjentów.

Należy podkreślić, że praca Anny Praski-Ogińskiej i Janusza Bednarskiego dołącza do danych, które wskazują na konieczność poprawy opieki nad pacjentem z HF w Polsce.

Lelonek_Malgorzata.JPG

prof. dr hab. n. med. Małgorzata Lelonek, FESC

Zakład Kardiologii Nieinwazyjnej Uniwersytetu Medycznego w Łodzi

Piśmiennictwo

  1. 1. Sekcja Niewydolności serca PTK. Niewydolność serca w Polsce — raport 2016. http://www.niewydolnosc-serca.pl/barometr.pdf (20.01.2017).
  2. 2. OECD indicators. Health at a glance 2015. OECD Publishing, Paris 2015.
  3. 3. Gierczynski J, Gryglewicz J, Karczewicz E. Niewydolność serca — analiza kosztów ekonomicznych i społecznych. Uczelnia Łazarskiego, Warszawa 2013.
  4. 4. Lelonek M. Niewydolność serca i powtarzające się hospitalizacje. Folia Cardiol. 2016; 11(1): 37–46, doi: 10.5603/fc.2016.0005.
  5. 5. Komajda M, Anker SD, Cowie MR, et al. QUALIFY Investigators. Physicians’ adherence to guideline-recommended medications in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: data from the QUALIFY global survey. Eur J Heart Fail. 2016; 18(5): 514–522, doi: 10.1002/ejhf.510, indexed in Pubmed: 27095461.
  6. 6. Opolski G, Ozierański K, Lelonek M, et al. Adherence to systolic heart failure guidelines in ambulatory care in Poland — data from the international QUALIFY survey. Pol Arch Intern Med. 2017 [Epub ahead of print], doi: 10.20452/pamw.4083, indexed in Pubmed: 28786405.
  7. 7. Ponikowski P, Voors A, Anker S, et al. Wytyczne ESC dotyczące diagnostyki i leczenia ostrej i przewlekłej niewydolności serca w 2016 roku. Kardiol Pol. 2016; 74(10): 1037–1147, doi: 10.5603/kp.2016.0141, indexed in Pubmed: 27748494.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

 

Wydawcą serwisu jest  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl