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Vol 15, Supp. A (2020)
Review Papers
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Postprandial lipemia: a clinical problem and potential place in cardiovascular risk estimation. The position of Polish experts

Anna Skoczyńska, Marta Wawrzynowicz-Syczewska, Marta Barlik-Rysa, Andrzej Danik, Jacek Różański, Krzysztof J. Filipiak, Barbara Cybulska
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2020.0001

open access

Vol 15, Supp. A (2020)
Review Papers

Abstract

The following elaboration presents positions of experts from various, mainly European scientific societies regarding utility of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) in predicting cardiovascular (CV) risk. New studies and different categories of patients have been included. The following text has been based mainly on 2019 European Society of Cardiology and European Atherosclerosis Society guidelines regarding the management of dyslipidemia, as well as the 2019 international expert panel document. The position of Polish experts on using oral fat tolerance test in clinical practice has also been presented. Remaining problem is to assess potential usefulness of postprandial HTG in estimation of CV risk and to determine whether performing the oral fat tolerance test, that involves consumption of a standard high-fat preparation followed by blood collection at indicated time intervals, can improve CV risk assessment. Although importance of postprandial HTG in the assessment of atherogenic risk is increasingly well documented, there is still need for further research.

Abstract

The following elaboration presents positions of experts from various, mainly European scientific societies regarding utility of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) in predicting cardiovascular (CV) risk. New studies and different categories of patients have been included. The following text has been based mainly on 2019 European Society of Cardiology and European Atherosclerosis Society guidelines regarding the management of dyslipidemia, as well as the 2019 international expert panel document. The position of Polish experts on using oral fat tolerance test in clinical practice has also been presented. Remaining problem is to assess potential usefulness of postprandial HTG in estimation of CV risk and to determine whether performing the oral fat tolerance test, that involves consumption of a standard high-fat preparation followed by blood collection at indicated time intervals, can improve CV risk assessment. Although importance of postprandial HTG in the assessment of atherogenic risk is increasingly well documented, there is still need for further research.
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Keywords

hypertriglyceridemia, cardiovascular risk, oral fat tolerance test (OFTT)

About this article
Title

Postprandial lipemia: a clinical problem and potential place in cardiovascular risk estimation. The position of Polish experts

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 15, Supp. A (2020)

Pages

1-17

DOI

10.5603/FC.2020.0001

Keywords

hypertriglyceridemia
cardiovascular risk
oral fat tolerance test (OFTT)

Authors

Anna Skoczyńska
Marta Wawrzynowicz-Syczewska
Marta Barlik-Rysa
Andrzej Danik
Jacek Różański
Krzysztof J. Filipiak
Barbara Cybulska

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