open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2019)
Review Papers
Published online: 2019-10-31
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Arrhythmias and autonomic nervous system dysfunction in acute and chronic diseases with right ventricle involvement

Monika Lisicka, Joanna Radochońska, Piotr Bienias
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2019.0101
·
Folia Cardiologica 2019;14(5):445-455.

open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2019)
Review Papers
Published online: 2019-10-31

Abstract

The right and left hearts differ from one another in their anatomy and function. This disparity demonstrates itself in different heart muscle compositions, arrangements of cardiac conduction system elements, and distributions of autonomic nervous system receptors. These differences mean that diseases that mainly affect the right heart, such as acute pulmonary embolism, chronic pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular infarction or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, as well as some congenital heart diseases and connective tissue diseases, have a distinct clinical course and potential complications. This leads to an increased incidence of cardiac rhythm disturbances in this group, with some types of arrhythmia for every disease. In order to help clinicians select the best diagnostic and therapeutic methods, we here summarise current knowledge about arrhythmic complications and cardiac autonomic nervous system functions in diseases with right heart involvement.

Abstract

The right and left hearts differ from one another in their anatomy and function. This disparity demonstrates itself in different heart muscle compositions, arrangements of cardiac conduction system elements, and distributions of autonomic nervous system receptors. These differences mean that diseases that mainly affect the right heart, such as acute pulmonary embolism, chronic pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular infarction or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, as well as some congenital heart diseases and connective tissue diseases, have a distinct clinical course and potential complications. This leads to an increased incidence of cardiac rhythm disturbances in this group, with some types of arrhythmia for every disease. In order to help clinicians select the best diagnostic and therapeutic methods, we here summarise current knowledge about arrhythmic complications and cardiac autonomic nervous system functions in diseases with right heart involvement.
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Keywords

arrhythmias, cardiac autonomic nervous system, acute pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular involvement

About this article
Title

Arrhythmias and autonomic nervous system dysfunction in acute and chronic diseases with right ventricle involvement

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 14, No 5 (2019)

Pages

445-455

Published online

2019-10-31

DOI

10.5603/FC.2019.0101

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2019;14(5):445-455.

Keywords

arrhythmias
cardiac autonomic nervous system
acute pulmonary embolism
pulmonary hypertension
right ventricular involvement

Authors

Monika Lisicka
Joanna Radochońska
Piotr Bienias

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