open access

Vol 73, No 6 (2022)
Original paper
Submitted: 2021-09-19
Accepted: 2022-08-07
Published online: 2022-12-09
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Hormones and depression in the advanced age

Katarzyna Winczyk1, Tomasz Kostka2, Hanna Pisarek, Hanna Pisarek, Agnieszka Guligowska, Agnieszka Guligowska, Edyta Piechocka-Wochniak, Edyta Piechocka-Wochniak, Jacek Świętosławski, Jacek Świętosławski, Marek Pawlikowski1
·
Pubmed: 36519649
·
Endokrynol Pol 2022;73(6):917-921.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Neuroendocrinology, Chair of Laboratory and Molecular Diagnostics, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Geriatrics, Healthy Ageing Research Centre, Medical University of Lodz, Poland

open access

Vol 73, No 6 (2022)
Original Paper
Submitted: 2021-09-19
Accepted: 2022-08-07
Published online: 2022-12-09

Abstract

Introduction: In older people, depression and mental disability are more frequently present than in younger subjects. It is found that depression is a risk factor for dementia, just as dementia is a risk factor for depression. In turn, both disturbances are known to be influenced by hormones. The present study aimed to see whether the hormonal changes in subjects over 75 years old correlate with the symptoms of depression measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS).

Material and methods: In a group of patients aged over 75 years, concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), oestradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAs), and cortisol were measured in serum with the use of chemiluminescence. The symptoms of depression were estimated by GDS, and the mental functions were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The correlations between the obtained results were estimated by Spearman’s test.

Results and Conclusions: A significant correlation between GDS and MMSE scores was observed in the investigated patients. Some statistically significant correlations concerning cortisol and testosterone with GDS were observed in women, but not in men. On the other hand, no significant correlations between concentrations of FSH, LH, DHEAs, and oestradiol with GDS were noticed. Our data support the role of cortisol (possibly secreted during chronic stress) in the risk of depression. The gender difference in the mechanism of depression and stress in older age could be also hypothesized.

Abstract

Introduction: In older people, depression and mental disability are more frequently present than in younger subjects. It is found that depression is a risk factor for dementia, just as dementia is a risk factor for depression. In turn, both disturbances are known to be influenced by hormones. The present study aimed to see whether the hormonal changes in subjects over 75 years old correlate with the symptoms of depression measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS).

Material and methods: In a group of patients aged over 75 years, concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), oestradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAs), and cortisol were measured in serum with the use of chemiluminescence. The symptoms of depression were estimated by GDS, and the mental functions were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The correlations between the obtained results were estimated by Spearman’s test.

Results and Conclusions: A significant correlation between GDS and MMSE scores was observed in the investigated patients. Some statistically significant correlations concerning cortisol and testosterone with GDS were observed in women, but not in men. On the other hand, no significant correlations between concentrations of FSH, LH, DHEAs, and oestradiol with GDS were noticed. Our data support the role of cortisol (possibly secreted during chronic stress) in the risk of depression. The gender difference in the mechanism of depression and stress in older age could be also hypothesized.

Get Citation

Keywords

depression; hormones; aging; GDS; MMSE

About this article
Title

Hormones and depression in the advanced age

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 73, No 6 (2022)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

917-921

Published online

2022-12-09

Page views

3884

Article views/downloads

918

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2022.0094

Pubmed

36519649

Bibliographic record

Endokrynol Pol 2022;73(6):917-921.

Keywords

depression
hormones
aging
GDS
MMSE

Authors

Katarzyna Winczyk
Tomasz Kostka
Hanna Pisarek
Hanna Pisarek
Agnieszka Guligowska
Agnieszka Guligowska
Edyta Piechocka-Wochniak
Edyta Piechocka-Wochniak
Jacek Świętosławski
Jacek Świętosławski
Marek Pawlikowski

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