open access

Vol 71, No 6 (2020)
Original paper
Published online: 2020-12-01
Submitted: 2020-08-18
Accepted: 2020-10-02
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Bone status in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes: a 10-year longitudinal study

Agata Chobot, Oliwia Janota, Katarzyna Bąk-Drabik, Joanna Polanska, Wojciech Pluskiewicz
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2020.0080
·
Pubmed: 33283260
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2020;71(6):532-538.

open access

Vol 71, No 6 (2020)
Original Paper
Published online: 2020-12-01
Submitted: 2020-08-18
Accepted: 2020-10-02

Abstract

Introduction: This study presents a 10-year longitudinal assessment of bone status in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Material and methods: Thirty-two patients (12 female, aged 20.5 ± 3.93 years, T1D duration 13.9 ± 1.97 years) were studied using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Standard deviation scores (SDS) for these results were calculated. The following clinical parameters were analysed: sex, age, T1D duration, anthropometric parameters, daily insulin requirement (DIR), mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in the year preceding the examination, medication other than insulin, history of bone fractures, and comorbidities.

Results: The current and past (measured 10 years earlier) QUS results did not differ and showed a significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.001). We found no relation of QUS results and anthropometric parameters or gender. DXA parameters did not correlate with the present QUS measurement. DXA and QUS results were independent of HbA1c, co-morbidities, or intake of additional medicaments.

Conclusions: Bone status parameters of the examined patients with currently suboptimal glycaemic control were found to be lowered in comparison to a normative reference population, both at baseline and follow-up, although no further deterioration was observed during the 10-year follow-up period. 

Abstract

Introduction: This study presents a 10-year longitudinal assessment of bone status in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Material and methods: Thirty-two patients (12 female, aged 20.5 ± 3.93 years, T1D duration 13.9 ± 1.97 years) were studied using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Standard deviation scores (SDS) for these results were calculated. The following clinical parameters were analysed: sex, age, T1D duration, anthropometric parameters, daily insulin requirement (DIR), mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in the year preceding the examination, medication other than insulin, history of bone fractures, and comorbidities.

Results: The current and past (measured 10 years earlier) QUS results did not differ and showed a significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.001). We found no relation of QUS results and anthropometric parameters or gender. DXA parameters did not correlate with the present QUS measurement. DXA and QUS results were independent of HbA1c, co-morbidities, or intake of additional medicaments.

Conclusions: Bone status parameters of the examined patients with currently suboptimal glycaemic control were found to be lowered in comparison to a normative reference population, both at baseline and follow-up, although no further deterioration was observed during the 10-year follow-up period. 

Get Citation

Keywords

type 1 diabetes; glycaemic control; bone status; quantitative ultrasound; dual X-ray absorptiometry

About this article
Title

Bone status in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes: a 10-year longitudinal study

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 71, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

532-538

Published online

2020-12-01

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2020.0080

Pubmed

33283260

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2020;71(6):532-538.

Keywords

type 1 diabetes
glycaemic control
bone status
quantitative ultrasound
dual X-ray absorptiometry

Authors

Agata Chobot
Oliwia Janota
Katarzyna Bąk-Drabik
Joanna Polanska
Wojciech Pluskiewicz

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