open access

Vol 71, No 4 (2020)
Original paper
Published online: 2020-06-26
Submitted: 2020-01-16
Accepted: 2020-05-14
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Associations between the levels of thyroid hormones and abdominal obesity in euthyroid post-menopausal women

Qiu Yang, Yan Hai Wan, Sheng De Hu, Yi Hong Cao
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2020.0037
·
Pubmed: 32901910
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2020;71(4):299-305.

open access

Vol 71, No 4 (2020)
Original Paper
Published online: 2020-06-26
Submitted: 2020-01-16
Accepted: 2020-05-14

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the association between thyroid hormones and abdominal fat quantities in euthyroid post-menopausal women.

Material and methods: Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (fT3), and free thyroxine (fT4) as well as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were collected from 540 euthyroid post menopausal women aged 45–65 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to measure visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine whether abdominal fat was associated with thyroid hormones.

Results: Weight, BMI, WC, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (Fins), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), TSH, and fT4 were higher in the obese group than in the nonobese group (p < 0.05). The study participants were divided into four groups according to quartiles in the light of TSH reference range (0.1–4.2 mU/L). Subcutaneous adipose tissue and VAT increased with the TSH levels. Adjusted for age, years since menopause (YSM), BMI, and HOMA-IR, VAT was negatively correlated with fT4 and positively correlated with fT3 and fT3-to-fT4 ratio (fT3/fT4) (p < 0.05), while no association was found between SAT and thyroid hormones. Similarly, we found no relation between body fat distribution and TSH. Furthermore, the association of common indicators of obesity and thyroid hormones showed no significance.

Conclusions: In euthyroid post-menopausal women, VAT rather than SAT was negatively correlated with fT4, and positively correlated with fT3 and fT3/fT4. 

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the association between thyroid hormones and abdominal fat quantities in euthyroid post-menopausal women.

Material and methods: Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (fT3), and free thyroxine (fT4) as well as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were collected from 540 euthyroid post menopausal women aged 45–65 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to measure visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine whether abdominal fat was associated with thyroid hormones.

Results: Weight, BMI, WC, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (Fins), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), TSH, and fT4 were higher in the obese group than in the nonobese group (p < 0.05). The study participants were divided into four groups according to quartiles in the light of TSH reference range (0.1–4.2 mU/L). Subcutaneous adipose tissue and VAT increased with the TSH levels. Adjusted for age, years since menopause (YSM), BMI, and HOMA-IR, VAT was negatively correlated with fT4 and positively correlated with fT3 and fT3-to-fT4 ratio (fT3/fT4) (p < 0.05), while no association was found between SAT and thyroid hormones. Similarly, we found no relation between body fat distribution and TSH. Furthermore, the association of common indicators of obesity and thyroid hormones showed no significance.

Conclusions: In euthyroid post-menopausal women, VAT rather than SAT was negatively correlated with fT4, and positively correlated with fT3 and fT3/fT4. 

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Keywords

post-menopausal; thyroid hormones; abdominal obesity; visceral adipose tissue; subcutaneous adipose tissue

About this article
Title

Associations between the levels of thyroid hormones and abdominal obesity in euthyroid post-menopausal women

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 71, No 4 (2020)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

299-305

Published online

2020-06-26

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2020.0037

Pubmed

32901910

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2020;71(4):299-305.

Keywords

post-menopausal
thyroid hormones
abdominal obesity
visceral adipose tissue
subcutaneous adipose tissue

Authors

Qiu Yang
Yan Hai Wan
Sheng De Hu
Yi Hong Cao

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