open access

Vol 69, No 2 (2018)
Original paper
Published online: 2018-03-29
Submitted: 2017-05-24
Accepted: 2017-12-28
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Serum sex hormones concentrations in young women in the early period after successful kidney transplantation

Ewelina Sikora-Grabka, Marcin Adamczak, Piotr Kuczera, Andrzej Wiecek
DOI: 10.5603/EP.2018.0019
·
Pubmed: 29952423
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2018;69(2):150-155.

open access

Vol 69, No 2 (2018)
Original Paper
Published online: 2018-03-29
Submitted: 2017-05-24
Accepted: 2017-12-28

Abstract

Background: Hormonal disorders are frequently present in hemodialysed patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In women with CKD sex hormones abnormalities may lead to irregular, often anovulatory cycles, sexual dysfunction and infertility. Kidney transplantation done in young women tends to ameliorate most of the aforementioned disorders and improve fertility. The aim of this study was to assess the changes of serum sex hormones concentration in young women before, and after the first 6 months after successful KTx Material and methods: Fourteen chronic hemodialysis women with CKD undergoing kidney transplantation and 46 apparently healthy women in similar age (control group) were enrolled into the study. In all women serum concentration of: FSH, LH, PRL and estradiol determined. Measurements in the transplanted group were done four times: immediately before surgery, in the 14th - and 30th - day and 6 months after the transplantation. The results are presented as means and 95% CI. Results: All of the women that have finished the study presented an excellent function of the transplanted kidney – mean serum creatinine concentration was 92.54 (74.85 – 110.23) µmol/l. After successful KTx a significant decrease in the serum concentrations of FSH and LH was observed. Decrease of serum PRL concentration after KTx did not reach statistical significance in the multiple comparisons analyses, but returned to the values observed in healthy controls. KTx did not significantly influence serum estradiol concentration. Conclusions: Successful kidney transplantation leads to the normalization of serum concentrations of hormones linked to fertility disorders in women with chronic kidney disease.

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Abstract

Background: Hormonal disorders are frequently present in hemodialysed patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In women with CKD sex hormones abnormalities may lead to irregular, often anovulatory cycles, sexual dysfunction and infertility. Kidney transplantation done in young women tends to ameliorate most of the aforementioned disorders and improve fertility. The aim of this study was to assess the changes of serum sex hormones concentration in young women before, and after the first 6 months after successful KTx Material and methods: Fourteen chronic hemodialysis women with CKD undergoing kidney transplantation and 46 apparently healthy women in similar age (control group) were enrolled into the study. In all women serum concentration of: FSH, LH, PRL and estradiol determined. Measurements in the transplanted group were done four times: immediately before surgery, in the 14th - and 30th - day and 6 months after the transplantation. The results are presented as means and 95% CI. Results: All of the women that have finished the study presented an excellent function of the transplanted kidney – mean serum creatinine concentration was 92.54 (74.85 – 110.23) µmol/l. After successful KTx a significant decrease in the serum concentrations of FSH and LH was observed. Decrease of serum PRL concentration after KTx did not reach statistical significance in the multiple comparisons analyses, but returned to the values observed in healthy controls. KTx did not significantly influence serum estradiol concentration. Conclusions: Successful kidney transplantation leads to the normalization of serum concentrations of hormones linked to fertility disorders in women with chronic kidney disease.

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Keywords

chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, sex hormones

About this article
Title

Serum sex hormones concentrations in young women in the early period after successful kidney transplantation

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 69, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

150-155

Published online

2018-03-29

DOI

10.5603/EP.2018.0019

Pubmed

29952423

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2018;69(2):150-155.

Keywords

chronic kidney disease
kidney transplantation
sex hormones

Authors

Ewelina Sikora-Grabka
Marcin Adamczak
Piotr Kuczera
Andrzej Wiecek

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