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Research paper
Published online: 2021-05-27
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The effect of educational intervention on medication adherence behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes: application of social marketing model

Zahra Najafpour, Isa Mohammadi Zeidi, Rohollah Kalhor
DOI: 10.5603/DK.a2021.0040

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles (submitted)
Published online: 2021-05-27

Abstract

Background: Patient’s adherence to the medication regimen leads to successful treatment in diabetic patients and a reduction in the severity of complications. Educational intervention is needed to improve behavior and change attitudes in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of educational intervention based on social marketing on promoting medication adherence behavior in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and methods: Using random sampling, 110 diabetic patients covered by health centers in Qazvin in the form of experimental and control groups participated in a randomized controlled trial. Data collection tools included demographic questions and valid scales related to psychological constructs and drug adherence. The intervention program consisted of 5 group training sessions for 90-60 minutes based on the initial needs assessment and the theoretical framework of the social marketing model for the experimental group. Also, a purposeful educational pamphlet, two sessions of telephone counseling, and educational messages via mobile phone were provided in addition to the group training program for patients in the experimental group. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 25 and independent sample t-test, Chi-square test, One-way ANOVA, and covariance analysis. Results: The mean age of study participants was (54.12 ± 8.22) years. Also, the average duration of diabetes was 5-10 years and 50% had primary education. The correlation between attitude, self-efficacy, and subjective norm with medication adherence behavior was significant (p <0.05). After the intervention based on the social marketing model, the mean of the constructs of attitude (39), self-efficacy (31), awareness (66), subjective norm (85), and medication adherence (49) increased significantly in the experimental group. Conclusion: Educational intervention based on social marketing could have a significant effect on improving medication adherence behavior. The design of cognitive-behavioral interventions based on social marketing is recommended to promote the health behaviors of diabetic patients.

Abstract

Background: Patient’s adherence to the medication regimen leads to successful treatment in diabetic patients and a reduction in the severity of complications. Educational intervention is needed to improve behavior and change attitudes in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of educational intervention based on social marketing on promoting medication adherence behavior in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and methods: Using random sampling, 110 diabetic patients covered by health centers in Qazvin in the form of experimental and control groups participated in a randomized controlled trial. Data collection tools included demographic questions and valid scales related to psychological constructs and drug adherence. The intervention program consisted of 5 group training sessions for 90-60 minutes based on the initial needs assessment and the theoretical framework of the social marketing model for the experimental group. Also, a purposeful educational pamphlet, two sessions of telephone counseling, and educational messages via mobile phone were provided in addition to the group training program for patients in the experimental group. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 25 and independent sample t-test, Chi-square test, One-way ANOVA, and covariance analysis. Results: The mean age of study participants was (54.12 ± 8.22) years. Also, the average duration of diabetes was 5-10 years and 50% had primary education. The correlation between attitude, self-efficacy, and subjective norm with medication adherence behavior was significant (p <0.05). After the intervention based on the social marketing model, the mean of the constructs of attitude (39), self-efficacy (31), awareness (66), subjective norm (85), and medication adherence (49) increased significantly in the experimental group. Conclusion: Educational intervention based on social marketing could have a significant effect on improving medication adherence behavior. The design of cognitive-behavioral interventions based on social marketing is recommended to promote the health behaviors of diabetic patients.

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Keywords

Social Marketing, Type 2 Diabetes, medication adherence, Education, Attitude

About this article
Title

The effect of educational intervention on medication adherence behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes: application of social marketing model

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-05-27

DOI

10.5603/DK.a2021.0040

Keywords

Social Marketing
Type 2 Diabetes
medication adherence
Education
Attitude

Authors

Zahra Najafpour
Isa Mohammadi Zeidi
Rohollah Kalhor

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