open access

Vol 10, No 3 (2021)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-02-22
Get Citation

Mobile health application based intervention for improvement of quality of life among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients

Lipilekha Patnaik, Sandeep Kumar Panigrahi, Abhay Kumar Sahoo, Debahuti Mishra, Saswatika Beura, Anil Kumar Muduli
DOI: 10.5603/DK.a2021.0014
·
Clinical Diabetology 2021;10(3):276-283.

open access

Vol 10, No 3 (2021)
Original articles (submitted)
Published online: 2021-02-22

Abstract

Background. Diabetes and its complications arebecoming
a major threat to public health. Quality of life
among diabetes patients is not optimum.
Objective. To know the usefulness of the mobile health
application for improvement of QoL and diabetes selfmanagement
activities of the type 2 diabetes patients.

Methods. The present study was conducted in a tertiary
care hospital for 2 years from October 2016 to October
2018. In this study, 66 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes
patients, educated, techno-friendly smart phone users,
aged between 18–60 years, were included. They
were allocated to intervention and control group by
block randomization method. Intervention group was
allotted to use the android application and control
group was allotted to use the website. The data were
imported and analyzed by SPSS v 20.

Results. Overall quality of life and general health was
70.26 ± 16.51; for physical health it was 59.52 ± 7.15,
for psychological it was 63.38 ± 9.2, for social relations
it was 74.87 ± 13.98 and for environment it was 71.87 ±
± 8.38. The score of overall quality of life was increased
in both control and intervention group during follow-ups.
It was found that there was significant improvement in
glucose management, dietary control, physical activity,
health care use and sum score. Wilk’s lambda was significant
for HbA1c both in control and intervention group.

Conclusions. Mobile-based applications with focusing
on diabetes self-management education may support
to reduce the complications of diabetes and improve
the QoL of diabetes patients.

Abstract

Background. Diabetes and its complications arebecoming
a major threat to public health. Quality of life
among diabetes patients is not optimum.
Objective. To know the usefulness of the mobile health
application for improvement of QoL and diabetes selfmanagement
activities of the type 2 diabetes patients.

Methods. The present study was conducted in a tertiary
care hospital for 2 years from October 2016 to October
2018. In this study, 66 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes
patients, educated, techno-friendly smart phone users,
aged between 18–60 years, were included. They
were allocated to intervention and control group by
block randomization method. Intervention group was
allotted to use the android application and control
group was allotted to use the website. The data were
imported and analyzed by SPSS v 20.

Results. Overall quality of life and general health was
70.26 ± 16.51; for physical health it was 59.52 ± 7.15,
for psychological it was 63.38 ± 9.2, for social relations
it was 74.87 ± 13.98 and for environment it was 71.87 ±
± 8.38. The score of overall quality of life was increased
in both control and intervention group during follow-ups.
It was found that there was significant improvement in
glucose management, dietary control, physical activity,
health care use and sum score. Wilk’s lambda was significant
for HbA1c both in control and intervention group.

Conclusions. Mobile-based applications with focusing
on diabetes self-management education may support
to reduce the complications of diabetes and improve
the QoL of diabetes patients.

Get Citation

Keywords

self-management, mhealth app, diabetes mellitus

About this article
Title

Mobile health application based intervention for improvement of quality of life among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 10, No 3 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

276-283

Published online

2021-02-22

DOI

10.5603/DK.a2021.0014

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2021;10(3):276-283.

Keywords

self-management
mhealth app
diabetes mellitus

Authors

Lipilekha Patnaik
Sandeep Kumar Panigrahi
Abhay Kumar Sahoo
Debahuti Mishra
Saswatika Beura
Anil Kumar Muduli

References (32)
  1. World Health Organization. Diabetes. SEARO. World Health Organization, South-East Asia Regional Office; 2017. Available from: http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/diabetes. [Last accessed at: January 5th, 2020].
  2. Massi-Benedetti M. CODE-2 Advisory Board. The cost of diabetes type II in Europe: the CODE-2 study. Diabetologia. 2002; 45(7): S1–S4.
  3. The World Health Organization quality of life assessment (WHOQOL): Development and general psychometric properties. Social Science & Medicine. 1998; 46(12): 1569–1585.
  4. Polonsky WH. Understanding and assessing diabetes-specific QoL. Diabetes Spectrum. 2000; 13(1): 36–41.
  5. Ambriz Murillo Y, Menor Almagro R, Campos-González ID, et al. Health related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, end stage renal disease and geriatric subjects. Experience from a General Hospital in Mexico. Reumatol Clin. 2015; 11(2): 68–72.
  6. Center for Disease Control (2005a). National Diabetes Fact Sheet, United States; 2005. Available from: www .cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2005.pdf. [Last accessed at: January 5th, 2020]. [Last retrieved on 2007 Apr. ; 10.
  7. Aghamolaei T, Eftekhar H, Mohammad K, et al. Effects of a health education program on behavior, HbA1c and health‐related quality Of life in diabetic patients. Acta Med Iran 2004;43. 2004; 43: 90–94.
  8. Mensing C, Boucher J, Cypress M, et al. National standards for diabetes self-management education. Diabetes Care. 2006; 29: 78–85.
  9. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes 2007. Diabetes Care. 2007; 30 Suppl 1: S4–S41.
  10. Norris SL, Lau J, Smith SJ, et al. Self-management education for adults with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of the effect on glycemic control. Diabetes Care. 2002; 25(7): 1159–1171.
  11. Goyal S, Morita P, Lewis GF, et al. The systematic design of a behavioural mobile health application for the self-management of type 2 diabetes. Can J Diabetes. 2016; 40(1): 95–104.
  12. Schmitt A, Gahr A, Hermanns N, et al. The diabetes self-management questionnaire (DSMQ): development and evaluation of an instrument to assess diabetes self-care activities associated with glycaemic control. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013; 11: 138.
  13. Schmitt A, Reimer A, Hermanns N, et al. Assessing diabetes self-management with the diabetes self-management questionnaire (DSMQ) can help analyse behavioural problems related to reduced glycaemic control. PLoS One. 2016; 11(3): e0150774.
  14. Development of the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF Quality of Life Assessment. Psychological Medicine. 1998; 28(3): 551–558.
  15. Skevington SM, Tucker C. Designing response scales for cross-cultural use in health care: data from the development of the UK WHOQOL. Br J Med Psychol. 1999; 72 ( Pt 1): 51–61.
  16. Didarloo A, Shojaeizadeh D, Alizadeh M. Impact of educational intervention based on interactive approaches on beliefs, behavior, hemoglobin a1c, and quality of life in diabetic women. Int J Prev Med. 2016; 7: 38.
  17. Mohammadi S, Karim N, Abd.Talib R, et al. Evaluation of quality of life among type 2 diabetes patients. International Journal of Community Medicine and Public Health. 2016: 51–56.
  18. Norris SL, Lau J, Smith SJ, et al. Self-management education for adults with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of the effect on glycemic control. Diabetes Care. 2002; 25(7): 1159–1171.
  19. Holmen H, Torbjørnsen A, Wahl AK, et al. A Mobile Health Intervention for Self-Management and Lifestyle Change for Persons With Type 2 Diabetes, Part 2: One-Year Results From the Norwegian Randomized Controlled Trial RENEWING HEALTH. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2014; 2(4): e57.
  20. Bonoto B, Araújo Vde, Godói I, et al. Efficacy of Mobile Apps to Support the Care of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. JMIR mHealth and uHealth. 2017; 5(3): e4.
  21. Skinner TC, Carey ME, Cradock S, et al. Diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND): process modelling of pilot study. Patient Educ Couns. 2006; 64(1-3): 369–377.
  22. Liang X, Wang Q, Yang X, et al. Effect of mobile phone intervention for diabetes on glycaemic control: a meta-analysis. Diabet Med. 2011; 28(4): 455–463.
  23. Cui M, Wu X, Mao J, et al. T2DM self-management via smartphone applications: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One. 2016; 11(11): e0166718.
  24. Frazetta D, Willet K, Fairchild RA. A systematic review of smartphone application use for type 2 diabetic patients. Online J Nurs Informatics. 2008; 2012: 1–9.
  25. Bene B, O’Connor S, Mastellos N, et al. Impact of mobile health applications on self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: protocol of a systematic review. BMJ Open. 2019; 9(6): e025714.
  26. Dizaji MB, Taghdisi MH, Solhi M, et al. Effects of educational intervention based on PRECEDE model on self care behaviors and control in patients with type 2 diabetes in 2012. J Diabetes Metab Disord. 2014; 13: 72.
  27. Rakhshandehro S, Heidarnia AR, Rajab A. Determination of health education on quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients. Daneshvar Med J. 2006; 13: 15–20.
  28. Pal K, Dack C, Ross J, et al. Digital health interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes: qualitative study of patient perspectives on diabetes self-management education and support. J Med Internet Res. 2018; 20(2): e40.
  29. Berndt RD, Takenga C, Preik P, et al. Impact of information technology on the therapy of type-1 diabetes: a case study of children and adolescents in Germany. J Pers Med. 2014; 4(2): 200–217.
  30. Rossi MCE, Nicolucci A, Di Bartolo P, et al. Diabetes Interactive Diary: a new telemedicine system enabling flexible diet and insulin therapy while improving quality of life: an open-label, international, multicenter, randomized study. Diabetes Care. 2010; 33(1): 109–115.
  31. Aghamolaei T, Eftekhar H, Mohammad K, et al. Effects of a health education program on behavior, HbA1c and health‐related quality Of life in diabetic patients. Acta Med Iran. 2004; 43: 90–94.
  32. Heisler M, Smith DM, Hayward RA, et al. How well do patients' assessments of their diabetes self-management correlate with actual glycemic control and receipt of recommended diabetes services? Diabetes Care. 2003; 26(3): 738–743.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

 

Wydawcą serwisu jest  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl