open access

Vol 9, No 5 (2020)
Other materials agreed with the Editors
Published online: 2020-09-28
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The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in patients with COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Monireh Faghir-Gangi, Hossein Moameri, Narges Abdolmohamadi, Shahrzad Nematollahi
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2020.0041
·
Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(5):271-278.

open access

Vol 9, No 5 (2020)
COVID-19 AND DIABETES
Published online: 2020-09-28

Abstract

Background. A strong link between morbidity andmortality from COVID-19 and diabetes mellitus is reported by many studies. The present study estimated the pooled prevalence of diabetes in patients with COVID-19. Methods. International scientific databases were searched until 15 April 2020. There was no limitation in time and language of the published papers. Quality assessment of studies was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) checklist. The random effects model was used to report the pooled prevalence with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results. The pooled prevalence of diabetes in patients with COVID-19 was 14% (95% CI: 11.17). Due to high heterogeneity (I2 of 93.4%, P < 0.001), three subgroups were analyzed based on study location, age and sex. The prevalence of diabetes (P) was higher among male patients (P = 16%, 95% CI: 0.12, 0.20), patients aged ≥ 65 years (P = 19%, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.31). The prevalence of diabetes was 15% (95% CI: 0.10, 0.20) among patients in Wuhan, China and 10% in patients in other cities in China (95% CI: 0.06, 0.15), and 39% in patients from other countries (95% CI: 0.04, 0.74). Conclusion. According to the results of this systematic review, the prevalence of diabetes in patients with COVID-19 is higher in other countries compared to China. The prevalence of diabetes among COVID-19 patients was also significantly higher in men and elderlies. This evidence may be useful for health policymakers to design suitable preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with diabetes and COVID-19.

Abstract

Background. A strong link between morbidity andmortality from COVID-19 and diabetes mellitus is reported by many studies. The present study estimated the pooled prevalence of diabetes in patients with COVID-19. Methods. International scientific databases were searched until 15 April 2020. There was no limitation in time and language of the published papers. Quality assessment of studies was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) checklist. The random effects model was used to report the pooled prevalence with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results. The pooled prevalence of diabetes in patients with COVID-19 was 14% (95% CI: 11.17). Due to high heterogeneity (I2 of 93.4%, P < 0.001), three subgroups were analyzed based on study location, age and sex. The prevalence of diabetes (P) was higher among male patients (P = 16%, 95% CI: 0.12, 0.20), patients aged ≥ 65 years (P = 19%, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.31). The prevalence of diabetes was 15% (95% CI: 0.10, 0.20) among patients in Wuhan, China and 10% in patients in other cities in China (95% CI: 0.06, 0.15), and 39% in patients from other countries (95% CI: 0.04, 0.74). Conclusion. According to the results of this systematic review, the prevalence of diabetes in patients with COVID-19 is higher in other countries compared to China. The prevalence of diabetes among COVID-19 patients was also significantly higher in men and elderlies. This evidence may be useful for health policymakers to design suitable preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with diabetes and COVID-19.

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Keywords

COVID-19, diabetes mellitus, prevalence, systematic review

About this article
Title

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in patients with COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 9, No 5 (2020)

Article type

Other materials agreed with the Editors

Pages

271-278

Published online

2020-09-28

DOI

10.5603/DK.2020.0041

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(5):271-278.

Keywords

COVID-19
diabetes mellitus
prevalence
systematic review

Authors

Monireh Faghir-Gangi
Hossein Moameri
Narges Abdolmohamadi
Shahrzad Nematollahi

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