open access

Vol 9, No 6 (2020)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-11-10
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Ophthalmologic disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Aleksandra Pilśniak, Adam Wylęgała, Ewa Otto-Buczkowska
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2020.0050
·
Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(6):493-496.

open access

Vol 9, No 6 (2020)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-11-10

Abstract

Chronic complications of diabetes, including damage to the eye, are seen in patients with type 2 diabetes often soon after diagnosis. This type of diabetes is often diagnosed after a long period of unrecognized and untreated disease. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common metabolic diseases diagnosed in children, and is associated with the risk of developing multiple chronic complications. Diabetic eye disease can be associated with abnormalities in various eye structures. It should be remembered that early changes in the organ of vision may not give clear clinical symptoms. Their detection requires the use of modern diagnostic methods, which also allow early detection of changes that threaten damage to the eye. The degree of metabolic control, the presence of dyslipidemia, as well as micro- and macroangiopathy affect the development of chronic complications, including changes in the eye. Damage to small blood vessels leads to changes in retinal perfusion and to macular edema. As a result of these changes, diabetic retinopathy develops. Early diagnosis of the above complications allows prevention of their development.

Abstract

Chronic complications of diabetes, including damage to the eye, are seen in patients with type 2 diabetes often soon after diagnosis. This type of diabetes is often diagnosed after a long period of unrecognized and untreated disease. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common metabolic diseases diagnosed in children, and is associated with the risk of developing multiple chronic complications. Diabetic eye disease can be associated with abnormalities in various eye structures. It should be remembered that early changes in the organ of vision may not give clear clinical symptoms. Their detection requires the use of modern diagnostic methods, which also allow early detection of changes that threaten damage to the eye. The degree of metabolic control, the presence of dyslipidemia, as well as micro- and macroangiopathy affect the development of chronic complications, including changes in the eye. Damage to small blood vessels leads to changes in retinal perfusion and to macular edema. As a result of these changes, diabetic retinopathy develops. Early diagnosis of the above complications allows prevention of their development.

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Keywords

diabetic cataract, diabetic retinopathy, intraocular pressure, metabolic control, type 1 diabetes, visual impairment

About this article
Title

Ophthalmologic disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 9, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

493-496

Published online

2020-11-10

DOI

10.5603/DK.2020.0050

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(6):493-496.

Keywords

diabetic cataract
diabetic retinopathy
intraocular pressure
metabolic control
type 1 diabetes
visual impairment

Authors

Aleksandra Pilśniak
Adam Wylęgała
Ewa Otto-Buczkowska

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