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A real-world retrospective evaluation of glycaemic control and weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with canagliflozin 100 mg and canagliflozin 300 mg in an Indian setting

Poulomi Mukherjee, Soumyabrata Roychowdhury, Anirban Majumder
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2020.0031

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-08-22

Abstract

Background. Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose co-transporter2 (SGLT2) inhibitor that improves glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by enhancing urinary glucose excretion (UGE). Indian data regarding comparative efficacy of canagliflozin 300 mg over canagliflozin 100 mg in reduction of body weight are scanty.
Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy of canagliflozin 100 mg versus canagliflozin 300 mg regarding loss of body weight retrospectively, in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with other antihypergycaemic agents (AHA) in a real world setting in India.
Material and methods. T2DM patients inadequately controlled (HbA1c > 8.5%) with diet, exercise and AHA who were prescribed canagliflozin 100 mg (n = 62) or canagliflozin 300 mg (n = 36) once daily, between May 2016 to May 2019 and were followed for at least 20 weeks, are included in the analysis. Changes in blood pressure and glycaemic parameters and body weight are studied.
Results. Results show that addition of canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided statistically significant improvements in glycaemic control associated with weight loss. However no superiority of canagliflozin 300 mg to canagliflozin 100 mg is established.
Conclusion. The present study shows that addition of canagliflozin 300 mg has no advantage over canagliflozin 100 mg on body weight when added on existing therapy with other AHA.

Abstract

Background. Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose co-transporter2 (SGLT2) inhibitor that improves glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by enhancing urinary glucose excretion (UGE). Indian data regarding comparative efficacy of canagliflozin 300 mg over canagliflozin 100 mg in reduction of body weight are scanty.
Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy of canagliflozin 100 mg versus canagliflozin 300 mg regarding loss of body weight retrospectively, in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with other antihypergycaemic agents (AHA) in a real world setting in India.
Material and methods. T2DM patients inadequately controlled (HbA1c > 8.5%) with diet, exercise and AHA who were prescribed canagliflozin 100 mg (n = 62) or canagliflozin 300 mg (n = 36) once daily, between May 2016 to May 2019 and were followed for at least 20 weeks, are included in the analysis. Changes in blood pressure and glycaemic parameters and body weight are studied.
Results. Results show that addition of canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided statistically significant improvements in glycaemic control associated with weight loss. However no superiority of canagliflozin 300 mg to canagliflozin 100 mg is established.
Conclusion. The present study shows that addition of canagliflozin 300 mg has no advantage over canagliflozin 100 mg on body weight when added on existing therapy with other AHA.

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Keywords

canagliflozin, SGLT2 inhibitors, T2DM

About this article
Title

A real-world retrospective evaluation of glycaemic control and weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with canagliflozin 100 mg and canagliflozin 300 mg in an Indian setting

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Ahead of print

Published online

2020-08-22

DOI

10.5603/DK.2020.0031

Keywords

canagliflozin
SGLT2 inhibitors
T2DM

Authors

Poulomi Mukherjee
Soumyabrata Roychowdhury
Anirban Majumder

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