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Vol 8, No 5 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-09-09
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A case series of five hypertensive type 2 diabetes patients showing reduction in blood pressure and mean arterial pressure reduction in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring with remogliflozin etabonate 200 mg coprescribed with recent onset anti-hypertensive drugs

Sayak Roy
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2019.0020
·
Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(5):254-257.

open access

Vol 8, No 5 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-09-09

Abstract

Introduction. Hypertension is commonly occurring in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome and inflammation are a well-known part of this disease entity. The data of using remogliflozin in Indian patient is not known as this is a very recently approved molecule for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we look into a case series of five patients who had their ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) done at baseline and again after 14 days of therapy of adding remogliflozin etabonate to recent onset antihypertensive druges.

Methods. We analysed the ABPM results of five patients after taking their informed consent at baseline and two weeks post-treatment initiation with remogliflozin alongside with recent onset antihypertensive drugs. We used paired t test for statistical analysis of the two readings of each patient to come to a conclusion.

Results. We found a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) reflected by a p value of 0.0277 and the reduction in mean awake time systolic blood pressure (SBP) was also very close to statistical significance as seen by the p value of 0.0541.

Conclusions. Remogliflozin etabonate when co-prescribed with antihypertensive drugs shows a significant reduction in MAP as well as reduction in SBP although most of the contribution seems to be coming from the antihypertensive molecule itself.

Abstract

Introduction. Hypertension is commonly occurring in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome and inflammation are a well-known part of this disease entity. The data of using remogliflozin in Indian patient is not known as this is a very recently approved molecule for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we look into a case series of five patients who had their ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) done at baseline and again after 14 days of therapy of adding remogliflozin etabonate to recent onset antihypertensive druges.

Methods. We analysed the ABPM results of five patients after taking their informed consent at baseline and two weeks post-treatment initiation with remogliflozin alongside with recent onset antihypertensive drugs. We used paired t test for statistical analysis of the two readings of each patient to come to a conclusion.

Results. We found a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) reflected by a p value of 0.0277 and the reduction in mean awake time systolic blood pressure (SBP) was also very close to statistical significance as seen by the p value of 0.0541.

Conclusions. Remogliflozin etabonate when co-prescribed with antihypertensive drugs shows a significant reduction in MAP as well as reduction in SBP although most of the contribution seems to be coming from the antihypertensive molecule itself.

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Keywords

type 2 diabetes; remogliflozin etabonate; mean arterial pressure; systolic blood pressure; ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

About this article
Title

A case series of five hypertensive type 2 diabetes patients showing reduction in blood pressure and mean arterial pressure reduction in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring with remogliflozin etabonate 200 mg coprescribed with recent onset anti-hypertensive drugs

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 8, No 5 (2019)

Pages

254-257

Published online

2019-09-09

DOI

10.5603/DK.2019.0020

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(5):254-257.

Keywords

type 2 diabetes
remogliflozin etabonate
mean arterial pressure
systolic blood pressure
ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

Authors

Sayak Roy

References (10)
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