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Vol 8, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-14
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Bacterial translocation markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus: their association with glycemic control and diabetic kidney disease in Egyptian patients

Talaat Abd El Fattah Abd Elaaty, Azza Abdelkerim Ismail, Marwa Ahmed Meheissen, Nada Ramadan El Essawy
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2019.0014
·
Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(4):195-204.

open access

Vol 8, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-08-14

Abstract

Background. The involvement of bacterial translocation in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been highlighted in recent years. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential impact of lipopolysaccaride-binding protein (LBP) and DNA translocation on glycemic control and progression to diabetic kidney disease in T2DM patients.

Material and methods. A total of 30 T2DM patients as well as 30 controls were included in a cross-sectional observational study. Plasma LBP levels were deter­mined using an enzyme linked immunoassay. DNA translocation was assessed using polymerase chain reaction targeting 16SrNA gene.

Results. Plasma levels of LBP were significantly elevated in T2DM patients than in controls (p = 0.02). LBP level was significantly and positively correlated with fasting glucose level, glycated hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, albumin-creatinine ratio and negatively correlated with glomerular filtration rate. Receiver operating curve revealed that LBP with a cut off of 15.17 μg/mL succeeded to predict both glycemic control and dia­betic kidney disease in T2DM patients. The bacterial 16SrRNA was detected in almost all blood samples of T2DM patients (28/30) and in about half (16/30) of the control group (p < 0.001).

Conclusion. Translocation products could trigger diabe­tes related complications. Future interventional work should target these products to reverse their effects.

Abstract

Background. The involvement of bacterial translocation in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been highlighted in recent years. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential impact of lipopolysaccaride-binding protein (LBP) and DNA translocation on glycemic control and progression to diabetic kidney disease in T2DM patients.

Material and methods. A total of 30 T2DM patients as well as 30 controls were included in a cross-sectional observational study. Plasma LBP levels were deter­mined using an enzyme linked immunoassay. DNA translocation was assessed using polymerase chain reaction targeting 16SrNA gene.

Results. Plasma levels of LBP were significantly elevated in T2DM patients than in controls (p = 0.02). LBP level was significantly and positively correlated with fasting glucose level, glycated hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, albumin-creatinine ratio and negatively correlated with glomerular filtration rate. Receiver operating curve revealed that LBP with a cut off of 15.17 μg/mL succeeded to predict both glycemic control and dia­betic kidney disease in T2DM patients. The bacterial 16SrRNA was detected in almost all blood samples of T2DM patients (28/30) and in about half (16/30) of the control group (p < 0.001).

Conclusion. Translocation products could trigger diabe­tes related complications. Future interventional work should target these products to reverse their effects.

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Keywords

type 2 diabetes mellitus; diabetic kidney disease; lipopolysaccharide binding protein; DNA translocation; bacterial translocation

About this article
Title

Bacterial translocation markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus: their association with glycemic control and diabetic kidney disease in Egyptian patients

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 8, No 4 (2019)

Pages

195-204

Published online

2019-08-14

DOI

10.5603/DK.2019.0014

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(4):195-204.

Keywords

type 2 diabetes mellitus
diabetic kidney disease
lipopolysaccharide binding protein
DNA translocation
bacterial translocation

Authors

Talaat Abd El Fattah Abd Elaaty
Azza Abdelkerim Ismail
Marwa Ahmed Meheissen
Nada Ramadan El Essawy

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