open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-04-04
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The association between depression and diabetes — the role of the hypothalamo- -pituitary-adrenal axis and chronic inflammation

Lidia Witek, Irina Kowalska, Agnieszka Adamska
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2019.0007
·
Pubmed: 23281285
·
Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(2):127-131.

open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-04-04

Abstract

Depression and diabetes belong to the most common diseases in the human population. Mood disorders
are often diagnosed in patients with chronic diseases, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Patients suffering from both diseases have been observed to have poorer blood glucose control, an increased risk of complications and mortality compared to the group with diabetes alone. The association between diabetes and depression is complex. Their frequent cooccurrence may be influenced by psychological factors, hormonal and immunological disorders. In depression,
hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation is observed, which causes peripheral hypercortisolemia. The excess of cortisol leads to hepatic glycogenolysis and reduction in insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues. It has been proven that depression is accompanied by chronic subclinical inflammation. In this review we present the data regarding the relation between hypercortisolemia, subclinical inflammation and depression in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Abstract

Depression and diabetes belong to the most common diseases in the human population. Mood disorders
are often diagnosed in patients with chronic diseases, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Patients suffering from both diseases have been observed to have poorer blood glucose control, an increased risk of complications and mortality compared to the group with diabetes alone. The association between diabetes and depression is complex. Their frequent cooccurrence may be influenced by psychological factors, hormonal and immunological disorders. In depression,
hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation is observed, which causes peripheral hypercortisolemia. The excess of cortisol leads to hepatic glycogenolysis and reduction in insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues. It has been proven that depression is accompanied by chronic subclinical inflammation. In this review we present the data regarding the relation between hypercortisolemia, subclinical inflammation and depression in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Get Citation

Keywords

depression, diabetes, hypercortisolemia, inflammation

About this article
Title

The association between depression and diabetes — the role of the hypothalamo- -pituitary-adrenal axis and chronic inflammation

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 8, No 2 (2019)

Pages

127-131

Published online

2019-04-04

DOI

10.5603/DK.2019.0007

Pubmed

23281285

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2019;8(2):127-131.

Keywords

depression
diabetes
hypercortisolemia
inflammation

Authors

Lidia Witek
Irina Kowalska
Agnieszka Adamska

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