open access

Vol 6, No 6 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-26
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Quality of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Tripoli Medical Center: a retrospective study of 628 patients

Hawa Juma El-Shareif
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2017.0033
·
Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(6):204-210.

open access

Vol 6, No 6 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-26

Abstract

Introduction. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major public health problem. Evidence has shown that aggressive control of hyperglycemia and associated risk factors reduces the risk of both macrovascular and micro­vascular complications. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of diabetes patients reaching the targets recommended by The American Diabetes Association (ADA) standards for diabetes care.

Methods and materials. This is a retrospective study, conducted at the diabetes outpatient clinics at TMC. For 628 patients with diabetes with at least two clinic visits in the 24 months before August 2010, we as­sessed measurement and control of HbA1c, blood pressure, and lipid, the data were collected in a spe­cially designed data sheet, and analyzed using SPSS program.

Results. 628 patients were studied. The mean age was 49.6 ± 11.8 years; average duration of diabetes was 6.5 ± 5.0 years. The mean last HbA1c was 8.2 ± 2.4%. 75.1% attained a systolic blood pressure of < 140 and 75.7% attained a diastolic blood pressure of < 90 mm Hg. Only 30.8% had LDL cholesterol of < 100 mg/dL and 49.0% had a triglyceride level of < 150 mg/dL. The rate of annual foot examination, retinal examination screening, and urine microalbumin screening were low.

Conclusions. This study demonstrates a low rate of diabetes care targets achievement among patients with type 2 diabetes treated at TMC. (Clin Diabetol

2017; 6, 6: 204–210)

Abstract

Introduction. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major public health problem. Evidence has shown that aggressive control of hyperglycemia and associated risk factors reduces the risk of both macrovascular and micro­vascular complications. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of diabetes patients reaching the targets recommended by The American Diabetes Association (ADA) standards for diabetes care.

Methods and materials. This is a retrospective study, conducted at the diabetes outpatient clinics at TMC. For 628 patients with diabetes with at least two clinic visits in the 24 months before August 2010, we as­sessed measurement and control of HbA1c, blood pressure, and lipid, the data were collected in a spe­cially designed data sheet, and analyzed using SPSS program.

Results. 628 patients were studied. The mean age was 49.6 ± 11.8 years; average duration of diabetes was 6.5 ± 5.0 years. The mean last HbA1c was 8.2 ± 2.4%. 75.1% attained a systolic blood pressure of < 140 and 75.7% attained a diastolic blood pressure of < 90 mm Hg. Only 30.8% had LDL cholesterol of < 100 mg/dL and 49.0% had a triglyceride level of < 150 mg/dL. The rate of annual foot examination, retinal examination screening, and urine microalbumin screening were low.

Conclusions. This study demonstrates a low rate of diabetes care targets achievement among patients with type 2 diabetes treated at TMC. (Clin Diabetol

2017; 6, 6: 204–210)

Get Citation

Keywords

glycemic control, diabetes type 2, Libya, TMC, targets, standards, quality of care, tertiary care

About this article
Title

Quality of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Tripoli Medical Center: a retrospective study of 628 patients

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 6, No 6 (2017)

Pages

204-210

Published online

2018-01-26

DOI

10.5603/DK.2017.0033

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(6):204-210.

Keywords

glycemic control
diabetes type 2
Libya
TMC
targets
standards
quality of care
tertiary care

Authors

Hawa Juma El-Shareif

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