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Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-04
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Smokers with type 1 diabetes are more insulin-resistant. Results from Poznan Prospective Study (PoProStu)

Aleksandra Uruska, Aleksandra Araszkiewicz, Pawel Uruski, Dariusz Naskret, Dorota Zozulinska-Ziolkiewicz
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2018.0007
·
Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(2):122-127.

open access

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-04

Abstract

Aim. The aim of the study was to evaluate the rela­tionship between smoking and insulin resistance in patients with type 1 diabetes (DM1).

Material and methods. The study group consisted of 81 patients with DM1 (51 men, 30 women) from the Poznan Prospective Study (PoProStu), aged 34 ± 6 years, and with diabetes duration 10 ± 1.5 years. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the smoking status: smokers and non-smokers. Insulin resistance was assessed on the basis of indirect param­eters such as: estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR), anthropometric data and liver function.

Results. Smokers (n = 36) in comparison with non-smokers (n = 45) had: higher weight (80.4 ± 14.4 vs. 72.9 ± 15 kg, p = 0.02), larger waist circumference (89.6 ± 10.5 vs. 83.1 ± 10.9 cm, p = 0.003), higher waist-to-hip ratio (0.9 ± 0.08 vs. 0.86 ± 0.09, p = 0.006), higher level of gamma-glutamyl transferase [23 (15–36) vs. 15 (11–21) U/l, p = 0.003] and lower eGDR (7.11 ± 2.47 vs. 8.82 ± 1.79 mg/kg/min, p = 0.001). A significant relationship, adjusted for age, duration of diabetes, triglycerids (TG) and high density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol level between smoking and eGDR < 7.5 mg/kg/min was revealed [odds ratio OR 4.39 (95% confidence interval CI 1.52–12.66); p = 0.005].

Conclusions. The results of this study confirm the healthy dimension of not smoking among people with type 1 diabetes. Smoking in patients with type 1 dia­betes, treated from the initial diagnosis with intensive insulin therapy, is associated with insulin resistance. (Clin Diabetol 2018; 7, 2: 122–127)  

Abstract

Aim. The aim of the study was to evaluate the rela­tionship between smoking and insulin resistance in patients with type 1 diabetes (DM1).

Material and methods. The study group consisted of 81 patients with DM1 (51 men, 30 women) from the Poznan Prospective Study (PoProStu), aged 34 ± 6 years, and with diabetes duration 10 ± 1.5 years. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the smoking status: smokers and non-smokers. Insulin resistance was assessed on the basis of indirect param­eters such as: estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR), anthropometric data and liver function.

Results. Smokers (n = 36) in comparison with non-smokers (n = 45) had: higher weight (80.4 ± 14.4 vs. 72.9 ± 15 kg, p = 0.02), larger waist circumference (89.6 ± 10.5 vs. 83.1 ± 10.9 cm, p = 0.003), higher waist-to-hip ratio (0.9 ± 0.08 vs. 0.86 ± 0.09, p = 0.006), higher level of gamma-glutamyl transferase [23 (15–36) vs. 15 (11–21) U/l, p = 0.003] and lower eGDR (7.11 ± 2.47 vs. 8.82 ± 1.79 mg/kg/min, p = 0.001). A significant relationship, adjusted for age, duration of diabetes, triglycerids (TG) and high density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol level between smoking and eGDR < 7.5 mg/kg/min was revealed [odds ratio OR 4.39 (95% confidence interval CI 1.52–12.66); p = 0.005].

Conclusions. The results of this study confirm the healthy dimension of not smoking among people with type 1 diabetes. Smoking in patients with type 1 dia­betes, treated from the initial diagnosis with intensive insulin therapy, is associated with insulin resistance. (Clin Diabetol 2018; 7, 2: 122–127)  

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Keywords

diabetes mellitus type 1, glucose disposal rate, insulin resistance, smoking

About this article
Title

Smokers with type 1 diabetes are more insulin-resistant. Results from Poznan Prospective Study (PoProStu)

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)

Pages

122-127

Published online

2018-04-04

DOI

10.5603/DK.2018.0007

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(2):122-127.

Keywords

diabetes mellitus type 1
glucose disposal rate
insulin resistance
smoking

Authors

Aleksandra Uruska
Aleksandra Araszkiewicz
Pawel Uruski
Dariusz Naskret
Dorota Zozulinska-Ziolkiewicz

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