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Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-04
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The levels of interleukin-2 and interleukin-10 in patients with type 2 diabetes and colon cancer

Irina Bosek, Roman Kuczerowski, Tomasz Miłek, Michał Rabijewski, Beata Kaleta, Monika Kniotek, Piotr Ciostek, Paweł Piątkiewicz
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2018.0006
·
Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(2):114-121.

open access

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-04

Abstract

Introduction. The risk of colon cancer (CC) develop­ment is increased significantly among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A mechanism responsible for a higher prevalence of CC among diabetic patients may be associated with disturbances of the immune system. Cytokines — interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-10 (IL- -10) play relevant role in the immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the immunological state in terms of IL-2 and IL-10 levels among groups of patients with T2DM, patients with CC, patients with T2DM and CC and patients without these diseases.

Material and methods. 80 patients were included in the tests and split into 4 groups: group 1 — 24 patients with T2DM, group 2 — 24 patients with CC, group 3 — 10 patients with CC and T2DM, and group 4 — 22 persons without T2DM or CC. Colonoscopy was per­formed for all the patients. All cases of colon cancer were confirmed by histopathological examination. Laboratory measurements included blood tests such as fasting glucose, insulin, C-peptide and HbA1c. The serum concentration of IL-2 and IL-10 was determined by the immunoenzymatic (ELISA) method.

Results. The concentration of IL-2 was statistically higher in the group of patients with T2DM and CC than in the groups of patients without those diseases (4.21 ± 1.61 SE pg/ml vs. group 1 — 1.57 ± 0.44 SE pg/ /ml, group 2 — 1.64 ± 0.27 SE pg/ml, group 4 — 1.95 ± 0.47 SE pg/ml; p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the concentrations of IL-10 in patients with T2DM and CC compared with other subjects. The level of fasting glucose and HbA1c in the groups of patients with T2DM (group 1) and T2DM with CC (group 3) was statistically higher than in the groups of patients without T2DM. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in levels of insulin, C-peptide and HOMA-IR.

Conclusions. The concentration of IL-2 was statistically higher in the group of patients with T2DM and colon cancer than in other groups. Elevated level of IL-2 can be a marker of an increased risk of CC in people with type 2 diabetes. It might be useful in indicating a group of patients with differences in immune system particularly susceptible to the development of colon cancer.  

Abstract

Introduction. The risk of colon cancer (CC) develop­ment is increased significantly among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A mechanism responsible for a higher prevalence of CC among diabetic patients may be associated with disturbances of the immune system. Cytokines — interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-10 (IL- -10) play relevant role in the immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the immunological state in terms of IL-2 and IL-10 levels among groups of patients with T2DM, patients with CC, patients with T2DM and CC and patients without these diseases.

Material and methods. 80 patients were included in the tests and split into 4 groups: group 1 — 24 patients with T2DM, group 2 — 24 patients with CC, group 3 — 10 patients with CC and T2DM, and group 4 — 22 persons without T2DM or CC. Colonoscopy was per­formed for all the patients. All cases of colon cancer were confirmed by histopathological examination. Laboratory measurements included blood tests such as fasting glucose, insulin, C-peptide and HbA1c. The serum concentration of IL-2 and IL-10 was determined by the immunoenzymatic (ELISA) method.

Results. The concentration of IL-2 was statistically higher in the group of patients with T2DM and CC than in the groups of patients without those diseases (4.21 ± 1.61 SE pg/ml vs. group 1 — 1.57 ± 0.44 SE pg/ /ml, group 2 — 1.64 ± 0.27 SE pg/ml, group 4 — 1.95 ± 0.47 SE pg/ml; p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the concentrations of IL-10 in patients with T2DM and CC compared with other subjects. The level of fasting glucose and HbA1c in the groups of patients with T2DM (group 1) and T2DM with CC (group 3) was statistically higher than in the groups of patients without T2DM. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in levels of insulin, C-peptide and HOMA-IR.

Conclusions. The concentration of IL-2 was statistically higher in the group of patients with T2DM and colon cancer than in other groups. Elevated level of IL-2 can be a marker of an increased risk of CC in people with type 2 diabetes. It might be useful in indicating a group of patients with differences in immune system particularly susceptible to the development of colon cancer.  

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Keywords

type 2 diabetes, colon cancer, interleukin-2, interleukin-10

About this article
Title

The levels of interleukin-2 and interleukin-10 in patients with type 2 diabetes and colon cancer

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 7, No 2 (2018)

Pages

114-121

Published online

2018-04-04

DOI

10.5603/DK.2018.0006

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2018;7(2):114-121.

Keywords

type 2 diabetes
colon cancer
interleukin-2
interleukin-10

Authors

Irina Bosek
Roman Kuczerowski
Tomasz Miłek
Michał Rabijewski
Beata Kaleta
Monika Kniotek
Piotr Ciostek
Paweł Piątkiewicz

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