open access

Vol 6, No 6 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-26
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Analysis of pathogens and their susceptibility in patients with diabetic foot syndrome treated surgically

Paweł Kumoniewski, Lech Pomorski, Jacek Śmigielski
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2017.0031
·
Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(6):189-194.

open access

Vol 6, No 6 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-26

Abstract

Introduction. Diabetes is one of the most common civilization diseases, which has a significant impact on particular individuals but also on society as a whole. Improper metabolism of sugars can lead to a number of complications affecting the whole body. From a surgical point of view treatment of diabetes complications, apart from optimizing the treatment of hyperglycaemia, is limited to the treatment of diabetic foot syndrome. The syndrome develops on a basis of microneuropathy, leading to development of necrotic lesions which are the perfect breeding ground for a number of bacteria. Adequate antibiotic therapy is one of the most important elements of all interdisciplinary therapy in treatment of diabetic foot syndrome.

Material and methods. In the present study, results of obtained swab cultures were evaluated to assess optimal antibiotic treatment, evaluating only the first bred isolate from the patient.

Results. In all 61 patients inflammatory infiltration of skin and soft tissues was observed, most of which accompa­nied by foot/leg wounds that healed after minor surgical interventions. A single pathogen was isolated in nearly half of the patients. In one patient, eight pathogens were isolated. The most commonly identified pathogens

 were Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Co­agulase-negative staphylococcus (other than S. Cohni, S. Epidermidis, S. Werneri, S. Haemoliticus).

Conclusions. Soft tissue infections in the diabetic foot syndrome are most frequently caused by several types of bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus. Based on the provided results, it appears that the op­timal start of antibiotic therapy would be the use of amoxicillin with clavulanic acid. (Clin Diabetol 2017; 6, 6: 189–194)

Abstract

Introduction. Diabetes is one of the most common civilization diseases, which has a significant impact on particular individuals but also on society as a whole. Improper metabolism of sugars can lead to a number of complications affecting the whole body. From a surgical point of view treatment of diabetes complications, apart from optimizing the treatment of hyperglycaemia, is limited to the treatment of diabetic foot syndrome. The syndrome develops on a basis of microneuropathy, leading to development of necrotic lesions which are the perfect breeding ground for a number of bacteria. Adequate antibiotic therapy is one of the most important elements of all interdisciplinary therapy in treatment of diabetic foot syndrome.

Material and methods. In the present study, results of obtained swab cultures were evaluated to assess optimal antibiotic treatment, evaluating only the first bred isolate from the patient.

Results. In all 61 patients inflammatory infiltration of skin and soft tissues was observed, most of which accompa­nied by foot/leg wounds that healed after minor surgical interventions. A single pathogen was isolated in nearly half of the patients. In one patient, eight pathogens were isolated. The most commonly identified pathogens

 were Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Co­agulase-negative staphylococcus (other than S. Cohni, S. Epidermidis, S. Werneri, S. Haemoliticus).

Conclusions. Soft tissue infections in the diabetic foot syndrome are most frequently caused by several types of bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus. Based on the provided results, it appears that the op­timal start of antibiotic therapy would be the use of amoxicillin with clavulanic acid. (Clin Diabetol 2017; 6, 6: 189–194)

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Keywords

diabetes, diabetic foot, diabetic complications, diabetic foot infections, amputation

About this article
Title

Analysis of pathogens and their susceptibility in patients with diabetic foot syndrome treated surgically

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 6, No 6 (2017)

Pages

189-194

Published online

2018-01-26

DOI

10.5603/DK.2017.0031

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(6):189-194.

Keywords

diabetes
diabetic foot
diabetic complications
diabetic foot infections
amputation

Authors

Paweł Kumoniewski
Lech Pomorski
Jacek Śmigielski

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