open access

Vol 6, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-09-29
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The association between the level of baseline daily physical activity and selected clinical and biochemical parameters during mountain trekking in patients with type 1 diabetes

Bartłomiej Matejko, Andrzej Gawrecki, Marta Wróbel, Jerzy Hohendorff, Teresa Benbenek-Klupa, Maciej T. Małecki, Dorota Zozulińska-Ziółkiewicz, Tomasz Klupa
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2017.0013
·
Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(3):77-80.

open access

Vol 6, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Published online: 2017-09-29

Abstract

Introduction. There is a general agreement that regular physical activity should be recommended for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), as it positively affects blood pressure and lipid levels and diminishes the risk of T1DM complications. Aim of this study was to search for a correlation between lactate level, de­gree of fatigue, and patient-reported physical activity in T1DM patients while trekking up to 3000 meters above sea level (masl).

Material and methods. Study group consisted of 19 participants (2 women) in mean age of 31 years with T1DM who summited 3000 masl in Alps. Clinical infor­mation was taken from patient questionnaire, personal insulin pumps and blood analysis (glucose, lactate level). Additionally patient self-assessment of physical activity and fatigue (Borg scale) was used.

Results. Declared physical activity in the last six months correlated with the initial, second, and final ratings of fatigue according to the Borg Scale during the expedition day, p = 0.02, r = –0.65; p = 0.02, r = –0.54; p = 0.01, r = –0.61, respectively. Blood lactate levels tended to increase with duration of exercise and altitude. Also, the average level of lactate on the expedition correlated with the average level of fatigue (p = 0.02, r = 0.57).

Conclusion. Before undertaking day-long mountain trekking, T1DM patients with a sedentary lifestyle should improve their fitness. The measurement of lactate levels can be a useful tool to predict fatigue as measured with the Borg Scale. (Clin Diabetol 2017; 6, 3: 77–80)

Abstract

Introduction. There is a general agreement that regular physical activity should be recommended for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), as it positively affects blood pressure and lipid levels and diminishes the risk of T1DM complications. Aim of this study was to search for a correlation between lactate level, de­gree of fatigue, and patient-reported physical activity in T1DM patients while trekking up to 3000 meters above sea level (masl).

Material and methods. Study group consisted of 19 participants (2 women) in mean age of 31 years with T1DM who summited 3000 masl in Alps. Clinical infor­mation was taken from patient questionnaire, personal insulin pumps and blood analysis (glucose, lactate level). Additionally patient self-assessment of physical activity and fatigue (Borg scale) was used.

Results. Declared physical activity in the last six months correlated with the initial, second, and final ratings of fatigue according to the Borg Scale during the expedition day, p = 0.02, r = –0.65; p = 0.02, r = –0.54; p = 0.01, r = –0.61, respectively. Blood lactate levels tended to increase with duration of exercise and altitude. Also, the average level of lactate on the expedition correlated with the average level of fatigue (p = 0.02, r = 0.57).

Conclusion. Before undertaking day-long mountain trekking, T1DM patients with a sedentary lifestyle should improve their fitness. The measurement of lactate levels can be a useful tool to predict fatigue as measured with the Borg Scale. (Clin Diabetol 2017; 6, 3: 77–80)

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Keywords

insulin pump, lactate level, physical fitness, diabetes type 1

About this article
Title

The association between the level of baseline daily physical activity and selected clinical and biochemical parameters during mountain trekking in patients with type 1 diabetes

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 6, No 3 (2017)

Pages

77-80

Published online

2017-09-29

DOI

10.5603/DK.2017.0013

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(3):77-80.

Keywords

insulin pump
lactate level
physical fitness
diabetes type 1

Authors

Bartłomiej Matejko
Andrzej Gawrecki
Marta Wróbel
Jerzy Hohendorff
Teresa Benbenek-Klupa
Maciej T. Małecki
Dorota Zozulińska-Ziółkiewicz
Tomasz Klupa

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