open access

Vol 6, No 5 (2017)
Review
Published online: 2017-12-28
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Participation of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus

Artur Chwalba, Ewa Otto-Buczkowska
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2017.0029
·
Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(5):178-181.

open access

Vol 6, No 5 (2017)
Review
Published online: 2017-12-28

Abstract

Recent research works suggest that an altered, quantitative composition and qualitative diversity of the gut microbiome may play an important role in the development of metabolic disorders. Growing evidence suggests that the gut bacteria contribute to the onset of the low-grade inflammation, characterising also metabolic disorders arising via mechanisms of the gut barrier dysfunction. The gut microbiome composition has been associated with several components of metabolic syndrome, obesity, type 2 diabetes, chronic cardiovascular diseases, and non-alcoholic liver steatosis. The composition of the gut microbiome also represents an important, environmental factor that influences the development of type 1 diabetes. Many studies have examined the mechanisms by which the control of the microbiomes may play a role in the prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Abstract

Recent research works suggest that an altered, quantitative composition and qualitative diversity of the gut microbiome may play an important role in the development of metabolic disorders. Growing evidence suggests that the gut bacteria contribute to the onset of the low-grade inflammation, characterising also metabolic disorders arising via mechanisms of the gut barrier dysfunction. The gut microbiome composition has been associated with several components of metabolic syndrome, obesity, type 2 diabetes, chronic cardiovascular diseases, and non-alcoholic liver steatosis. The composition of the gut microbiome also represents an important, environmental factor that influences the development of type 1 diabetes. Many studies have examined the mechanisms by which the control of the microbiomes may play a role in the prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes.
Get Citation

Keywords

gut microbiome; pathogenesis of obesity; insulin resistance; type 2 diabetes; type 1 diabetes

About this article
Title

Participation of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 6, No 5 (2017)

Pages

178-181

Published online

2017-12-28

DOI

10.5603/DK.2017.0029

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(5):178-181.

Keywords

gut microbiome
pathogenesis of obesity
insulin resistance
type 2 diabetes
type 1 diabetes

Authors

Artur Chwalba
Ewa Otto-Buczkowska

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