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Vol 6, No 4 (2017)
Review articles (submitted)
Published online: 2017-11-17
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Is HbA1c the only choice? Alternative biomarkers for glycaemic control assessment

Edyta Cichocka, Janusz Gumprecht
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2017.0023
·
Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(4):136-141.

open access

Vol 6, No 4 (2017)
Review articles (submitted)
Published online: 2017-11-17

Abstract

A rise in concentrations of glycated proteins occurs in diabetic patients; glycated hemoglobin is the most significant parameter, a ‘gold standard’ for glycaemic control. Other serum proteins also become glycated, i.a albumins and immunoglobulins. In practice, Fructosamine and glycated albumin are used. However, some conditions influence HbA1c concentrations, hence the search for alternative biomarkers for glycaemia monitoring. Glycated albumin (GA) appears to be the most promising, as its assessment enables both faster detection of changes in glycaemia control in cases of poor metabolic discipline and documentation of glyceamic control improvement, after appropriate treatment is implemented. This may be important mostly in patients scheduled for surgical, cardiosurgical or orthopedic procedures, which are sometimes postponed because of inadequate glycaemia control. Monitoring GA in particular groups of patients (i.a during pregnancy, with renal insufficiency or haematologic comorbidities) reflects glycaemic control levels more accurately than HbA1c.

Abstract

A rise in concentrations of glycated proteins occurs in diabetic patients; glycated hemoglobin is the most significant parameter, a ‘gold standard’ for glycaemic control. Other serum proteins also become glycated, i.a albumins and immunoglobulins. In practice, Fructosamine and glycated albumin are used. However, some conditions influence HbA1c concentrations, hence the search for alternative biomarkers for glycaemia monitoring. Glycated albumin (GA) appears to be the most promising, as its assessment enables both faster detection of changes in glycaemia control in cases of poor metabolic discipline and documentation of glyceamic control improvement, after appropriate treatment is implemented. This may be important mostly in patients scheduled for surgical, cardiosurgical or orthopedic procedures, which are sometimes postponed because of inadequate glycaemia control. Monitoring GA in particular groups of patients (i.a during pregnancy, with renal insufficiency or haematologic comorbidities) reflects glycaemic control levels more accurately than HbA1c.

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Keywords

diabetes, HbA1c, glycated albumin

About this article
Title

Is HbA1c the only choice? Alternative biomarkers for glycaemic control assessment

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 6, No 4 (2017)

Pages

136-141

Published online

2017-11-17

DOI

10.5603/DK.2017.0023

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2017;6(4):136-141.

Keywords

diabetes
HbA1c
glycated albumin

Authors

Edyta Cichocka
Janusz Gumprecht

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