open access

Vol 5, No 6 (2016)
Review articles (submitted)
Published online: 2017-03-31
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Results of the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study: Overview of the most important results from the Polish perspective

Kajetana Foryciarz, Marcin Obrębski, Andrzej Kokoszka
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2016.0032
·
Clinical Diabetology 2016;5(6):185-194.

open access

Vol 5, No 6 (2016)
Review articles (submitted)
Published online: 2017-03-31

Abstract

Introduction. The main aim of the second DAWN study conducted among patients with diabetes, families of people with diabetes and professionals involved in the treatment of diabetes in 17 countries as well as results in Poland in the context of the results obtained in other countries is a brief presentation of the most important general results.

Material and methods. The study involved more than fifteen thousand participants from 17 countries. The patients and family members were contacted via the Internet, by phone or in person. Medical professionals filled questionnaires sent via Internet. Questionnaires adapted from previous DAWN studies as well as developed specifically for the purpose of this study were used to collect data.

Results. The study involved 8596 adult patients with diabetes. The percentage of patients with probable depression [WHO-5 Well-Being Index (WHO-5) results ≤ 28] was 14.8%, with 19.2% in Poland. Diabetes-associated distress [questionnaire score Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale 5 (PAID-5) ≥ 40] was declared by 41.1% (in Poland 56.7%) of patients and the negative impact of the disease, in regards to their physical health, was declared by 61.2% of respondents (72.1% in Poland). The family members study group consisted of 2057 subjects among whom an average of 33.7% evaluated the care of the patient as a burden (in Poland 47.1%). Concerns about a sick person reported a significant percentage of family members, most of which, 62.1%, were related to episodes of hypoglycaemia (in Poland 65.2%). Family members declared their desire for higher involvement in the care of patients — 38.7% (in Poland, 31.6%) as well as greater involvement in the patient’s emotional problems associated with the disease, 45.6% (41.4% in Poland). The medical professionals study group consisted of 4785 subjects providing medical care for patients with diabetes. In most, an average of 85.4% of respondents believed that shared responsibility increases the efficiency of dia­betes treatment (in Poland 86.6%). The most important areas of self-treatment were: improvement in healthy eating 91.6% (in Poland 94.8%) and increased physical activity — 93.4% (in Poland 95.7%). The organization of healthcare was evaluated as good on average by 27.6% respondents, but only by 8% in Poland. The need for better availability of diabetes nurse specialists was ex­pressed by 66.3% of respondents (in Poland 76.8%); the need of better team communication — 57.6% (in Poland 67.6%); improved access to psychological and psychiatric consultations 59.7% (in Poland 74.7%).

Conclusions. There were significant differences between countries observed regarding each parameter, but there was no country which results as a whole were better or worse than others. Research at the international level with the use of psychometric indicators can help identify both the obstacles and opportunities for the effective treatment of diabetes.

Abstract

Introduction. The main aim of the second DAWN study conducted among patients with diabetes, families of people with diabetes and professionals involved in the treatment of diabetes in 17 countries as well as results in Poland in the context of the results obtained in other countries is a brief presentation of the most important general results.

Material and methods. The study involved more than fifteen thousand participants from 17 countries. The patients and family members were contacted via the Internet, by phone or in person. Medical professionals filled questionnaires sent via Internet. Questionnaires adapted from previous DAWN studies as well as developed specifically for the purpose of this study were used to collect data.

Results. The study involved 8596 adult patients with diabetes. The percentage of patients with probable depression [WHO-5 Well-Being Index (WHO-5) results ≤ 28] was 14.8%, with 19.2% in Poland. Diabetes-associated distress [questionnaire score Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale 5 (PAID-5) ≥ 40] was declared by 41.1% (in Poland 56.7%) of patients and the negative impact of the disease, in regards to their physical health, was declared by 61.2% of respondents (72.1% in Poland). The family members study group consisted of 2057 subjects among whom an average of 33.7% evaluated the care of the patient as a burden (in Poland 47.1%). Concerns about a sick person reported a significant percentage of family members, most of which, 62.1%, were related to episodes of hypoglycaemia (in Poland 65.2%). Family members declared their desire for higher involvement in the care of patients — 38.7% (in Poland, 31.6%) as well as greater involvement in the patient’s emotional problems associated with the disease, 45.6% (41.4% in Poland). The medical professionals study group consisted of 4785 subjects providing medical care for patients with diabetes. In most, an average of 85.4% of respondents believed that shared responsibility increases the efficiency of dia­betes treatment (in Poland 86.6%). The most important areas of self-treatment were: improvement in healthy eating 91.6% (in Poland 94.8%) and increased physical activity — 93.4% (in Poland 95.7%). The organization of healthcare was evaluated as good on average by 27.6% respondents, but only by 8% in Poland. The need for better availability of diabetes nurse specialists was ex­pressed by 66.3% of respondents (in Poland 76.8%); the need of better team communication — 57.6% (in Poland 67.6%); improved access to psychological and psychiatric consultations 59.7% (in Poland 74.7%).

Conclusions. There were significant differences between countries observed regarding each parameter, but there was no country which results as a whole were better or worse than others. Research at the international level with the use of psychometric indicators can help identify both the obstacles and opportunities for the effective treatment of diabetes.

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Keywords

diabetes, care delivery, psychosocial factors, patient experience, family members, medical professionals

About this article
Title

Results of the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study: Overview of the most important results from the Polish perspective

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 5, No 6 (2016)

Pages

185-194

Published online

2017-03-31

DOI

10.5603/DK.2016.0032

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2016;5(6):185-194.

Keywords

diabetes
care delivery
psychosocial factors
patient experience
family members
medical professionals

Authors

Kajetana Foryciarz
Marcin Obrębski
Andrzej Kokoszka

References (16)
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