open access

Vol 4, No 2 (2002)
Published online: 2002-09-03
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Colour-coded duplex scanning in determination of anatomical end-points in deep vein thrombosis progression in lower extremities

Grzegorz Madycki, Piotr Słowiński, Zbigniew Kwietniak, Walerian Staszkiewicz
Chirurgia Polska 2002;4(2):61-68.

open access

Vol 4, No 2 (2002)
Published online: 2002-09-03

Abstract

Introduction: Acute deep venous thrombosis still remains a severe clinical problem and the pathophysiology of the extension of thrombi remains obscure. The aim of the study was to analyse the actual extension of thrombosis among the individuals in order to find any natural, anatomical sites helping to stop the progression of DVT.
Material and methods: Over a period of 3 years (1998–2000) authors evaluated 130 patients treated for DVT in the Department of Vascular Surgery, Warsaw. Evaluation of the extension of DVT was done with the use of high-resolution ultrasonography.
Results: Results were compared against the clinical data obtained from patients and analysed using linear regression test and correlation coefficient test. Authors found that some deep vein tributaries may play a very important role in the limitation of DVT progression. These anatomical sites (named by the authors as natural end-points) are: 1. deep femoral/superficial femoral vein junction; 2. internal iliac/external iliac vein junction; 3. bilateral common iliac vein junction.
Conclusions: Authors conclude that some deep veins, such as the deep femoral vein, internal iliac vein and contralateral common iliac vein may play an important role in the extension of DVT. The popliteal vein, probably due to its anatomical location, has no sufficient tributary helping to stop DVT progression in this region.

Abstract

Introduction: Acute deep venous thrombosis still remains a severe clinical problem and the pathophysiology of the extension of thrombi remains obscure. The aim of the study was to analyse the actual extension of thrombosis among the individuals in order to find any natural, anatomical sites helping to stop the progression of DVT.
Material and methods: Over a period of 3 years (1998–2000) authors evaluated 130 patients treated for DVT in the Department of Vascular Surgery, Warsaw. Evaluation of the extension of DVT was done with the use of high-resolution ultrasonography.
Results: Results were compared against the clinical data obtained from patients and analysed using linear regression test and correlation coefficient test. Authors found that some deep vein tributaries may play a very important role in the limitation of DVT progression. These anatomical sites (named by the authors as natural end-points) are: 1. deep femoral/superficial femoral vein junction; 2. internal iliac/external iliac vein junction; 3. bilateral common iliac vein junction.
Conclusions: Authors conclude that some deep veins, such as the deep femoral vein, internal iliac vein and contralateral common iliac vein may play an important role in the extension of DVT. The popliteal vein, probably due to its anatomical location, has no sufficient tributary helping to stop DVT progression in this region.
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Keywords

deep venous thrombosis; ultrasound; diagnosis

About this article
Title

Colour-coded duplex scanning in determination of anatomical end-points in deep vein thrombosis progression in lower extremities

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 4, No 2 (2002)

Pages

61-68

Published online

2002-09-03

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2002;4(2):61-68.

Keywords

deep venous thrombosis
ultrasound
diagnosis

Authors

Grzegorz Madycki
Piotr Słowiński
Zbigniew Kwietniak
Walerian Staszkiewicz

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