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Original Article
Published online: 2021-08-17
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Mindfulness-based emotional regulation for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators: A randomized pilot study of efficacy, applicability, and safety

Santiago Montero Ruiz1, Beatriz Rodriguez Vega21, Carmen Bayón Pérez21, Rafael Peinado Peinado21
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2021.0094
·
Pubmed: 34490600
Affiliations
  1. Faculty of Medicine. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  2. La Paz University Hospital, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid, Spain

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2021-08-17

Abstract

Background: The efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions to reduce anxiety or improve quality of life (QoL) in patients with cardiac pathologies is well established. However, there is scarce information on the efficacy, applicability, and safety of these interventions in adult patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). In this study, we examined their efficacy on QoL, psychological and biomedical variables, as well as the applicability and safety of a mindfulness-based intervention in patients with an ICD.

Methods: Ninety-six patients with an ICD were randomized into two intervention groups and a control group. The interventions involved training in mindfulness-based emotional regulation, either face-to-face or using the “REM Volver a casa” mobile phone application (app).

Results: The sample presented medium-high QoL baseline scores (mean: 68), low anxiety (6.84) and depression (3.89), average mindfulness disposition (128), and cardiological parameters similar to other ICD populations. After the intervention, no significant differences were found in the variables studied between the intervention and control groups. Retention was average (59%), and there were no adverse effects due to the intervention.

Conclusions: After training in mindfulness-based emotional regulation (face-to-face or via app), no significant differences were found in the QoL or psychological or biomedical variables in patients with an ICD. The intervention proved to be safe, with 59% retention.

Abstract

Background: The efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions to reduce anxiety or improve quality of life (QoL) in patients with cardiac pathologies is well established. However, there is scarce information on the efficacy, applicability, and safety of these interventions in adult patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). In this study, we examined their efficacy on QoL, psychological and biomedical variables, as well as the applicability and safety of a mindfulness-based intervention in patients with an ICD.

Methods: Ninety-six patients with an ICD were randomized into two intervention groups and a control group. The interventions involved training in mindfulness-based emotional regulation, either face-to-face or using the “REM Volver a casa” mobile phone application (app).

Results: The sample presented medium-high QoL baseline scores (mean: 68), low anxiety (6.84) and depression (3.89), average mindfulness disposition (128), and cardiological parameters similar to other ICD populations. After the intervention, no significant differences were found in the variables studied between the intervention and control groups. Retention was average (59%), and there were no adverse effects due to the intervention.

Conclusions: After training in mindfulness-based emotional regulation (face-to-face or via app), no significant differences were found in the QoL or psychological or biomedical variables in patients with an ICD. The intervention proved to be safe, with 59% retention.

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Keywords

quality of life, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, emotional regulation, mindfulness, anxiety

About this article
Title

Mindfulness-based emotional regulation for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators: A randomized pilot study of efficacy, applicability, and safety

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2021-08-17

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2021.0094

Pubmed

34490600

Keywords

quality of life
implantable cardioverter defibrillator
emotional regulation
mindfulness
anxiety

Authors

Santiago Montero Ruiz
Beatriz Rodriguez Vega
Carmen Bayón Pérez
Rafael Peinado Peinado

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