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Published online: 2021-02-27
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Angio-CT reveals differences in renal arteries anatomy in resistant hypertension patients qualified for renal denervation vs pseudo-resistant hypertensive subjects.

Tomasz Skowerski, Mariusz Skowerski, Andrzej Kułach, Tomasz Roleder, Andrzej Ochała, Zbigniew Gąsior
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2021.0026
·
Pubmed: 33645628

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2021-02-27

Abstract

Background: Renal denervation is a novel therapeutic option in resistant hypertension (RHT). The anatomy of renal arteries and the presence of additional renal arteries are important determinants of the effect of the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the anatomy of renal arteries using angio-computed tomography in patients with RHT, who were qualified for renal denervation. Methods: We analyzed angio-computed tomography scans of the renal arteries of 72 patients qualified for renal denervation. We divided the study population into two groups: a resistant hypertension group (RHT) and a pseudo-resistant hypertension group (NRHT). The biochemical and endocrine diagnostic procedures were performed to rule out secondary hypertension. We analyzed the morphology, the diameters, and the number of additional renal arteries. Results: In both groups, we found additional renal arteries. Additional renal arteries (ARN) were more frequent in RHT than in patients with non-resistant hypertension (48.4% vs. 24.3%; p < 0.05). They were present more often on the left side (18 left side vs. 7 right side). The ARNs were longer than main renal artery — left side 41.7 ± 12.1 mm vs. 51.1 ± 11.8 mm, right side 49.2 ± 14.5 mm vs. 60 ± 8.6 mm, respectively (p < 0.05). The diameters of ARN were similar in both groups. In the group of patients with resistant hypertension the number of additional renal arteries was significantly higher (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The ARNs occur more often in patients with RHT. It seems that there is no connection between the resistance of hypertension and the diameters of renal arteries.

Abstract

Background: Renal denervation is a novel therapeutic option in resistant hypertension (RHT). The anatomy of renal arteries and the presence of additional renal arteries are important determinants of the effect of the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the anatomy of renal arteries using angio-computed tomography in patients with RHT, who were qualified for renal denervation. Methods: We analyzed angio-computed tomography scans of the renal arteries of 72 patients qualified for renal denervation. We divided the study population into two groups: a resistant hypertension group (RHT) and a pseudo-resistant hypertension group (NRHT). The biochemical and endocrine diagnostic procedures were performed to rule out secondary hypertension. We analyzed the morphology, the diameters, and the number of additional renal arteries. Results: In both groups, we found additional renal arteries. Additional renal arteries (ARN) were more frequent in RHT than in patients with non-resistant hypertension (48.4% vs. 24.3%; p < 0.05). They were present more often on the left side (18 left side vs. 7 right side). The ARNs were longer than main renal artery — left side 41.7 ± 12.1 mm vs. 51.1 ± 11.8 mm, right side 49.2 ± 14.5 mm vs. 60 ± 8.6 mm, respectively (p < 0.05). The diameters of ARN were similar in both groups. In the group of patients with resistant hypertension the number of additional renal arteries was significantly higher (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The ARNs occur more often in patients with RHT. It seems that there is no connection between the resistance of hypertension and the diameters of renal arteries.

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Keywords

renal denervation, renal artery anatomy, resistant hypertension

About this article
Title

Angio-CT reveals differences in renal arteries anatomy in resistant hypertension patients qualified for renal denervation vs pseudo-resistant hypertensive subjects.

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2021-02-27

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2021.0026

Pubmed

33645628

Keywords

renal denervation
renal artery anatomy
resistant hypertension

Authors

Tomasz Skowerski
Mariusz Skowerski
Andrzej Kułach
Tomasz Roleder
Andrzej Ochała
Zbigniew Gąsior

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