open access

Vol 21, No 4 (2014)
Original articles
Published online: 2014-08-29
Get Citation

Levels of anxiety and depression as predictors of mortality following myocardial infarction: A 5-year follow-up

Seyed Hamzeh Hosseini, Ali Ghaemian, Elaheh Mehdizadeh, Haleh Ashraf
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2014.0023
·
Cardiol J 2014;21(4):370-377.

open access

Vol 21, No 4 (2014)
Original articles
Published online: 2014-08-29

Abstract

Background: Post-myocardial infarction (MI) depression is a highly prevalent disorder, affec­ting nearly 18% of all MI patients, and it is a major predictor of disability in the year post-MI. We sought to expand this analysis by: comparing case-level anxiety, depression, and comorbid anxiety and depression as predictors of long term mortality during a 5-year follow-up period after MI; and investigating the role of potential modifying and confounding factors.

Methods: A total of 285 patients were screened on average 6 days after their MI and a 5-year survival rate was ascertained. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were completed by patients hospitalized for MI. In addition we tested the BDI × STAI interaction effect.

Results: During the 5 years of follow-up, cardiac mortality was assessed in 274 of 285 eligible patients. Of the 274 patients whose survival data were available, 91 (33.2%) died. At entry, BDI score of 192 (67.4%) patients was ≥ 10 and 145 (50.9%) patients had STAI score ≥ 40. Anxiety was not associated with mortality, whereas depression significantly predicted death, but this association was attenuated to non-significance with full adjustment with disease severity and confounders.

Conclusions: Depression following MI does not predict longer-term survival with full adjustment.

Abstract

Background: Post-myocardial infarction (MI) depression is a highly prevalent disorder, affec­ting nearly 18% of all MI patients, and it is a major predictor of disability in the year post-MI. We sought to expand this analysis by: comparing case-level anxiety, depression, and comorbid anxiety and depression as predictors of long term mortality during a 5-year follow-up period after MI; and investigating the role of potential modifying and confounding factors.

Methods: A total of 285 patients were screened on average 6 days after their MI and a 5-year survival rate was ascertained. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were completed by patients hospitalized for MI. In addition we tested the BDI × STAI interaction effect.

Results: During the 5 years of follow-up, cardiac mortality was assessed in 274 of 285 eligible patients. Of the 274 patients whose survival data were available, 91 (33.2%) died. At entry, BDI score of 192 (67.4%) patients was ≥ 10 and 145 (50.9%) patients had STAI score ≥ 40. Anxiety was not associated with mortality, whereas depression significantly predicted death, but this association was attenuated to non-significance with full adjustment with disease severity and confounders.

Conclusions: Depression following MI does not predict longer-term survival with full adjustment.

Get Citation

Keywords

depression, anxiety, myocardial infarction, mortality

About this article
Title

Levels of anxiety and depression as predictors of mortality following myocardial infarction: A 5-year follow-up

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 21, No 4 (2014)

Pages

370-377

Published online

2014-08-29

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2014.0023

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2014;21(4):370-377.

Keywords

depression
anxiety
myocardial infarction
mortality

Authors

Seyed Hamzeh Hosseini
Ali Ghaemian
Elaheh Mehdizadeh
Haleh Ashraf

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, fax:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl