open access

Vol 15, No 4 (2008)
Original articles
Published online: 2008-05-21
Get Citation

Remote second-hand tobacco exposure in flight attendants is associated with systemic but not pulmonary hypertension

Xiushui Ren, Pamela Y.F. Hsu, Fiona L. Dulbecco, Kirsten E. Fleischmann, Warren M. Gold, Rita F. Redberg, Nelson B. Schiller
Cardiol J 2008;15(4):338-343.

open access

Vol 15, No 4 (2008)
Original articles
Published online: 2008-05-21

Abstract

Background: Second-hand tobacco smoke has been associated with cardiopulmonary dysfunction. We sought to examine the residual effects of remote second-hand smoke exposure on resting and exercise cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. We hypothesized that remote secondhand smoke exposure results in persistent cardiopulmonary hemodynamic abnormalities.
Methods: Participants were non-smoking flight attendants who worked in airline cabins prior to the in-flight tobacco ban. Participants underwent clinical evaluations and completed smoke exposure questionnaires. We used Doppler echocardiography to measure pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest and during supine bicycle ergometer exercise, using the validated formula TRV/VTIRVOT × 10 + 0.16, where VTIRVOT is the velocity time integral at the right ventricular outflow tract and TRV is the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. The group was divided into quartiles according to the degree of smoke exposure. Analysis of variance was used to determine the differences in hemodynamic outcomes.
Results: Seventy-nine flight attendants were included in our analysis. Baseline characteristics among participants in each quartile of smoke exposure were similar except for history of systemic hypertension, which was more prevalent in the highest quartile. Peak exercise PASP rose to the same degree in all test groups (mean PASP 44 mm Hg, p = 0.25), and PVR increased by approximately 27% in all quartiles. There was no significant difference in pulmonary artery systolic pressure or pulmonary vascular resistance among quartiles of smoke exposure.
Conclusions: We found that remote heavy second-hand smoke exposure from in-flight tobacco is associated with systemic hypertension but does not have demonstrable pulmonary hemodynamic consequences.

Abstract

Background: Second-hand tobacco smoke has been associated with cardiopulmonary dysfunction. We sought to examine the residual effects of remote second-hand smoke exposure on resting and exercise cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. We hypothesized that remote secondhand smoke exposure results in persistent cardiopulmonary hemodynamic abnormalities.
Methods: Participants were non-smoking flight attendants who worked in airline cabins prior to the in-flight tobacco ban. Participants underwent clinical evaluations and completed smoke exposure questionnaires. We used Doppler echocardiography to measure pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest and during supine bicycle ergometer exercise, using the validated formula TRV/VTIRVOT × 10 + 0.16, where VTIRVOT is the velocity time integral at the right ventricular outflow tract and TRV is the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. The group was divided into quartiles according to the degree of smoke exposure. Analysis of variance was used to determine the differences in hemodynamic outcomes.
Results: Seventy-nine flight attendants were included in our analysis. Baseline characteristics among participants in each quartile of smoke exposure were similar except for history of systemic hypertension, which was more prevalent in the highest quartile. Peak exercise PASP rose to the same degree in all test groups (mean PASP 44 mm Hg, p = 0.25), and PVR increased by approximately 27% in all quartiles. There was no significant difference in pulmonary artery systolic pressure or pulmonary vascular resistance among quartiles of smoke exposure.
Conclusions: We found that remote heavy second-hand smoke exposure from in-flight tobacco is associated with systemic hypertension but does not have demonstrable pulmonary hemodynamic consequences.
Get Citation

Keywords

second-hand smoke; echocardiography; exercise physiology; pulmonary artery pressure

About this article
Title

Remote second-hand tobacco exposure in flight attendants is associated with systemic but not pulmonary hypertension

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 15, No 4 (2008)

Pages

338-343

Published online

2008-05-21

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2008;15(4):338-343.

Keywords

second-hand smoke
echocardiography
exercise physiology
pulmonary artery pressure

Authors

Xiushui Ren
Pamela Y.F. Hsu
Fiona L. Dulbecco
Kirsten E. Fleischmann
Warren M. Gold
Rita F. Redberg
Nelson B. Schiller

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, fax:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl