open access

Vol 18, No 3 (2011)
Original articles
Published online: 2011-06-09
Submitted: 2013-01-14
Get Citation

Impact of moderate coronary atherosclerosis on long-term left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement

Jose Antonio Linares Vicente, Isaac Lacambra Blasco, Pilar Portero Perez, Borja Simo Sanchez, Maria Rosario Ortas Nadal, Jose Ramón Ruiz Arroyo, Mariano González Carretero, Alfonso Del Rio Ligorit
Cardiol J 2011;18(3):277-281.

open access

Vol 18, No 3 (2011)
Original articles
Published online: 2011-06-09
Submitted: 2013-01-14

Abstract

Background: The role of coronary atherosclerosis (CA+) in ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for isolated aortic stenosis (AS) is not well defined. We sought to evaluate the impact of not revascularized moderate coronary atherosclerosis in long-term left ventricular (LV) remodeling after AVR.
Methods: We assessed by coronariography the coronary artery disease in 66 patients referred for AVR and evaluated morphological and functional LV data by echocardiography both preoperatively and postoperatively (3 ± 1.2 years).
Results: In patients without coronary atherosclerosis, hypertrophy regression was more intense and the absolute reverse remodeling was higher in LV mass index (–55.8 ± 36 g/m2 vs –28.4 ± 34 g/m2, p = 0.004), reduction of LV dimensions (LV end-diastolic diameter [LVEDD]: –4.1 ± 7.4 mm vs –2.2 ± 8.3 mm, p = 0.04), and regression of wall thickness (interventricular septum [IVS]: –3.3 ± 2.6 mm vs –1.6 ± 2.2 mm, p = 0.01; and posterior wall thickness [PWT]: –2.1 ± 2.1 mm vs 0.6 ± 2.1 mm, p = 0.012).
Conclusions: After AVR for AS, not revascularized moderate coronary atherosclerosis determines a long-term lesser degree of LV hypertrophy regression and a worse absolute reverse remodeling of LV mass index, LVEDD, IVS and PWT. (Cardiol J 2011; 18, 3: 277–281)

Abstract

Background: The role of coronary atherosclerosis (CA+) in ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for isolated aortic stenosis (AS) is not well defined. We sought to evaluate the impact of not revascularized moderate coronary atherosclerosis in long-term left ventricular (LV) remodeling after AVR.
Methods: We assessed by coronariography the coronary artery disease in 66 patients referred for AVR and evaluated morphological and functional LV data by echocardiography both preoperatively and postoperatively (3 ± 1.2 years).
Results: In patients without coronary atherosclerosis, hypertrophy regression was more intense and the absolute reverse remodeling was higher in LV mass index (–55.8 ± 36 g/m2 vs –28.4 ± 34 g/m2, p = 0.004), reduction of LV dimensions (LV end-diastolic diameter [LVEDD]: –4.1 ± 7.4 mm vs –2.2 ± 8.3 mm, p = 0.04), and regression of wall thickness (interventricular septum [IVS]: –3.3 ± 2.6 mm vs –1.6 ± 2.2 mm, p = 0.01; and posterior wall thickness [PWT]: –2.1 ± 2.1 mm vs 0.6 ± 2.1 mm, p = 0.012).
Conclusions: After AVR for AS, not revascularized moderate coronary atherosclerosis determines a long-term lesser degree of LV hypertrophy regression and a worse absolute reverse remodeling of LV mass index, LVEDD, IVS and PWT. (Cardiol J 2011; 18, 3: 277–281)
Get Citation

Keywords

aortic stenosis; valve replacement; ventricular remodeling

About this article
Title

Impact of moderate coronary atherosclerosis on long-term left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 18, No 3 (2011)

Pages

277-281

Published online

2011-06-09

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2011;18(3):277-281.

Keywords

aortic stenosis
valve replacement
ventricular remodeling

Authors

Jose Antonio Linares Vicente
Isaac Lacambra Blasco
Pilar Portero Perez
Borja Simo Sanchez
Maria Rosario Ortas Nadal
Jose Ramón Ruiz Arroyo
Mariano González Carretero
Alfonso Del Rio Ligorit

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, fax:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl