open access

Vol 18, No 6 (2011)
Original articles
Published online: 2011-11-23
Submitted: 2013-01-14
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Acute alcohol consumption is associated with increased interatrial electromechanical delay in healthy men

Cihan Sengul, Cihan Cevik, Olcay Ozveren, Aysegul Sunbul, Vecih Oduncu, Taylan Akgun, Mehmet Mustafa Can, Ender Semiz, Ismet Dindar
Cardiol J 2011;18(6):682-686.

open access

Vol 18, No 6 (2011)
Original articles
Published online: 2011-11-23
Submitted: 2013-01-14

Abstract

Background: Acute alcohol consumption can cause atrial fibrillation in patients with, and without, heart disease. Increased atrial electromechanical delay (EMD) has been associated with atrial fibrillation. We evaluated the atrial conduction properties by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) echocardiography in healthy men following acute alcohol intake.
Methods: Thirty healthy male volunteers were included in this study. Baseline ECG, heart rate, blood pressure, and TDI echocardiographic findings were compared to readings taken one hour after drinking six 12-oz cans of beer (76.8 g of ethanol).
Results
: Although the blood pressure and heart rate remained similar before and one hour after alcohol intake, Pmax and Pd values were significantly prolonged (114.2 ± 10.4 vs 100.8 ± 10.6, p = 0.002; 50.6 ± 9.6 vs 34.5 ± 8.8, p < 0.0001). Interatrial EMD was significantly increased after drinking alcohol compared to the baseline (19.8 ± 9.2 vs 14.0 ± 5.5 ms, p < 0.0002).
Conclusions: Acute moderate alcohol intake was associated with an increased interatrial EMD obtained by TDI echocardiography. This finding may help explain how these patients express increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation. (Cardiol J 2011; 18, 6: 682–686)

Abstract

Background: Acute alcohol consumption can cause atrial fibrillation in patients with, and without, heart disease. Increased atrial electromechanical delay (EMD) has been associated with atrial fibrillation. We evaluated the atrial conduction properties by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) echocardiography in healthy men following acute alcohol intake.
Methods: Thirty healthy male volunteers were included in this study. Baseline ECG, heart rate, blood pressure, and TDI echocardiographic findings were compared to readings taken one hour after drinking six 12-oz cans of beer (76.8 g of ethanol).
Results
: Although the blood pressure and heart rate remained similar before and one hour after alcohol intake, Pmax and Pd values were significantly prolonged (114.2 ± 10.4 vs 100.8 ± 10.6, p = 0.002; 50.6 ± 9.6 vs 34.5 ± 8.8, p < 0.0001). Interatrial EMD was significantly increased after drinking alcohol compared to the baseline (19.8 ± 9.2 vs 14.0 ± 5.5 ms, p < 0.0002).
Conclusions: Acute moderate alcohol intake was associated with an increased interatrial EMD obtained by TDI echocardiography. This finding may help explain how these patients express increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation. (Cardiol J 2011; 18, 6: 682–686)
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Keywords

alcohol; atrial fibrillation; echocardiography

About this article
Title

Acute alcohol consumption is associated with increased interatrial electromechanical delay in healthy men

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 18, No 6 (2011)

Pages

682-686

Published online

2011-11-23

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2011;18(6):682-686.

Keywords

alcohol
atrial fibrillation
echocardiography

Authors

Cihan Sengul
Cihan Cevik
Olcay Ozveren
Aysegul Sunbul
Vecih Oduncu
Taylan Akgun
Mehmet Mustafa Can
Ender Semiz
Ismet Dindar

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