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open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2007)
Original articles
Published online: 2007-09-07
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Does the palliative medicine specialist cope better with stress than an anaesthetist, surgeon or general practitioner? A study on job-related experience and behaviour patterns

Magdalena Muszalska, Małgorzata Krajnik, Maria Rogiewicz
Advances in Palliative Medicine 2007;6(2):69-73.

open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2007)
Original articles
Published online: 2007-09-07

Abstract

Background. Long-lasting stress and its consequences, such as burnout syndrome, should be avoided by medical practitioners in any specialization. Stress, as a huge and increasingly common problem, has an influence on the well-being of medical practitioners, as well as on the quality of their services. The aim of the study was to determine how palliative medicine specialists (PAL), surgeons (SUR), anaesthetists (AN) or general practitioners (GP) cope with stress and whether their personality traits have an influence on job-related experience and behaviour patterns.
Material and methods. A sample of 302 medical practitioners (PAL - 79, GP - 84, SUR - 74, AN - 65) was asked to complete an inventory: "Job-related experience and behaviour patterns" - AVEM/MECCA. Analysis included the distribution of preferred job-related experiences and behaviour patterns. A correlation between previously tested (with NEO-FFI) personal traits of PAL and these results was also examined.
Results. There are two dominant patterns of behaviour helping to cope with overwork and stress among PAL: pattern G, beneficial to health and development at work, and type A, which shows risk due to severe strain. In comparison with AN, SUR and GP, PAL have the smallest predominance of risk patterns (A + B) over those beneficial to health (G + S). PALs are characterized by the strongest social support and satisfaction from life. Personal traits typical for PAL, such as the low level of neuroticism and high degree of extraversion and openness to experience, may serve as a buffer in situations of overload from prolonged stress.
Conclusion. Results suggest that palliative medicine specialists cope better with job stress than medical practitioners in other studied specializations.

Abstract

Background. Long-lasting stress and its consequences, such as burnout syndrome, should be avoided by medical practitioners in any specialization. Stress, as a huge and increasingly common problem, has an influence on the well-being of medical practitioners, as well as on the quality of their services. The aim of the study was to determine how palliative medicine specialists (PAL), surgeons (SUR), anaesthetists (AN) or general practitioners (GP) cope with stress and whether their personality traits have an influence on job-related experience and behaviour patterns.
Material and methods. A sample of 302 medical practitioners (PAL - 79, GP - 84, SUR - 74, AN - 65) was asked to complete an inventory: "Job-related experience and behaviour patterns" - AVEM/MECCA. Analysis included the distribution of preferred job-related experiences and behaviour patterns. A correlation between previously tested (with NEO-FFI) personal traits of PAL and these results was also examined.
Results. There are two dominant patterns of behaviour helping to cope with overwork and stress among PAL: pattern G, beneficial to health and development at work, and type A, which shows risk due to severe strain. In comparison with AN, SUR and GP, PAL have the smallest predominance of risk patterns (A + B) over those beneficial to health (G + S). PALs are characterized by the strongest social support and satisfaction from life. Personal traits typical for PAL, such as the low level of neuroticism and high degree of extraversion and openness to experience, may serve as a buffer in situations of overload from prolonged stress.
Conclusion. Results suggest that palliative medicine specialists cope better with job stress than medical practitioners in other studied specializations.
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Keywords

palliative medicine specialists; personality; job stress and coping strategies; job burnout syndrome

About this article
Title

Does the palliative medicine specialist cope better with stress than an anaesthetist, surgeon or general practitioner? A study on job-related experience and behaviour patterns

Journal

Advances in Palliative Medicine

Issue

Vol 6, No 2 (2007)

Pages

69-73

Published online

2007-09-07

Bibliographic record

Advances in Palliative Medicine 2007;6(2):69-73.

Keywords

palliative medicine specialists
personality
job stress and coping strategies
job burnout syndrome

Authors

Magdalena Muszalska
Małgorzata Krajnik
Maria Rogiewicz

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