open access

Vol 53, No 4 (2022)
Original research article
Submitted: 2022-02-20
Accepted: 2022-04-10
Published online: 2022-06-05
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Standardizing blood dose using body surface area and analyze the effect of blood storage on hemoglobin increment within pediatric patients

Sankalp Sharma1, Sunil Jondhale2, Mili Patel2, Arvind Shukla3, Anil Goel2
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.a2022.0029
·
Acta Haematol Pol 2022;53(4):285-292.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Transfusion Medicine and Blood Bank, All India Institute of Medical Sciences Raipur, GE Road Tatibandh Raipur Chhattisgarh India, 492099 Raipur, India
  2. Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences Raipur, Raipur (Chhattisgarh), India
  3. Biostatistician, Department of Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences Raipur, Raipur (Chhattisgarh), India

open access

Vol 53, No 4 (2022)
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Submitted: 2022-02-20
Accepted: 2022-04-10
Published online: 2022-06-05

Abstract

Introduction: Pediatric patients exhibit a wide variation in weight which results in diverse transfusion practices. This study aims to standardize red blood cell (RBC) doses according to body surface area (BSA) and to analyze the role of RBC storage in post-transfusion hemoglobin levels.

Material and methods: In this original prospective cohort study on hospitalized pediatric patients aged up to 14, we classified patients into transfusion-dependent (n = 31) and non-transfusion-dependent (n = 158). The non-transfusiondependent group was further classified into ≤10 kg (n = 72) or >10 kg (n = 86) according to body weight (bw). We derived a regression equation between BSA and blood dose in non-transfusion-dependent subjects, and modified the equation by fixing blood dose to 15 mL/kg bw for only BSA based blood dose. We measured pre-transfusion and post-transfusion hemoglobin (Hb) levels, and ascertained effects of blood storage ≤15 days (n = 15) and >15 days (n = 16) on posttransfusion Hb.

Results: Pediatric patients ≤10 kg and >10 kg bw (n = 158); mean ± standard deviation of weight and BSA were 4.5 ± 3.1 kg; 22.9 ± 10.4 kg; 0.26 ± 0.14 m2; 0.9 ± 0.28) m2 respectively. The regression equation ≤10 kg and >10 kg bw when adjusted. Blood dose fixed at 15 mL/kg bw adjusted blood dose ≤10 kg; 15 mL/kg bw = −19.12 + 329.69x BSA m2. The regression equation >10 kg bw: adjusted blood dose >10 kg bw; 15 mL/kg bw = −158.8 + 563.3x BSA (m2). The adjusted blood dose with BSA did not exceed 20 mL/kg bw. No significant differences were observed in pre and post-transfusion Hb in transfusion-dependent (n = 31) versus non-transfusion-dependent patients (n = 158) due to the RBC storage duration.

Conclusions: RBC blood dose can be standardized by regression equation between standardized RBC dosage and BSA. Post-transfusion Hb is not dependent on days of RBC storage at the blood bank.

Abstract

Introduction: Pediatric patients exhibit a wide variation in weight which results in diverse transfusion practices. This study aims to standardize red blood cell (RBC) doses according to body surface area (BSA) and to analyze the role of RBC storage in post-transfusion hemoglobin levels.

Material and methods: In this original prospective cohort study on hospitalized pediatric patients aged up to 14, we classified patients into transfusion-dependent (n = 31) and non-transfusion-dependent (n = 158). The non-transfusiondependent group was further classified into ≤10 kg (n = 72) or >10 kg (n = 86) according to body weight (bw). We derived a regression equation between BSA and blood dose in non-transfusion-dependent subjects, and modified the equation by fixing blood dose to 15 mL/kg bw for only BSA based blood dose. We measured pre-transfusion and post-transfusion hemoglobin (Hb) levels, and ascertained effects of blood storage ≤15 days (n = 15) and >15 days (n = 16) on posttransfusion Hb.

Results: Pediatric patients ≤10 kg and >10 kg bw (n = 158); mean ± standard deviation of weight and BSA were 4.5 ± 3.1 kg; 22.9 ± 10.4 kg; 0.26 ± 0.14 m2; 0.9 ± 0.28) m2 respectively. The regression equation ≤10 kg and >10 kg bw when adjusted. Blood dose fixed at 15 mL/kg bw adjusted blood dose ≤10 kg; 15 mL/kg bw = −19.12 + 329.69x BSA m2. The regression equation >10 kg bw: adjusted blood dose >10 kg bw; 15 mL/kg bw = −158.8 + 563.3x BSA (m2). The adjusted blood dose with BSA did not exceed 20 mL/kg bw. No significant differences were observed in pre and post-transfusion Hb in transfusion-dependent (n = 31) versus non-transfusion-dependent patients (n = 158) due to the RBC storage duration.

Conclusions: RBC blood dose can be standardized by regression equation between standardized RBC dosage and BSA. Post-transfusion Hb is not dependent on days of RBC storage at the blood bank.

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Keywords

body surface area, regression equation, RBC storage changes, dose banding

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Title

Standardizing blood dose using body surface area and analyze the effect of blood storage on hemoglobin increment within pediatric patients

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Vol 53, No 4 (2022)

Article type

Original research article

Pages

285-292

Published online

2022-06-05

Page views

1675

Article views/downloads

103

DOI

10.5603/AHP.a2022.0029

Bibliographic record

Acta Haematol Pol 2022;53(4):285-292.

Keywords

body surface area
regression equation
RBC storage changes
dose banding

Authors

Sankalp Sharma
Sunil Jondhale
Mili Patel
Arvind Shukla
Anil Goel

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