open access

Vol 28, No 2 (2022)
Research paper
Published online: 2022-08-16
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Prevalence and impact of metabolic syndrome on outcomes of acute coronary syndrome patients in two different countries

Viola Keczeli1, Ied Al-Sadoon1, Orsolya Máté2, Sára Jeges1, Éva Polyák3, Annamária Karamánné Pakai2, Mercédesz Ahmann1, Andrea Gubicskóné Kisbenedek3, Zsófia Verzár13
·
Acta Angiologica 2022;28(2):44-51.
Affiliations
  1. University of Pécs, Faculty of Health Sciences, Doctoral School of Health Sciences, Vörösmarty street 4., 7621 Pécs, Hungary
  2. Institute of Nursing Sciences, Basic Health Sciences and Health Visiting, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pécs, Vörösmarty street 4., 7621 Pécs, Hungary
  3. University of Pécs, Faculty of Health Sciences, Institute of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vörösmarty u. 4., 7621 Pécs, Hungary

open access

Vol 28, No 2 (2022)
Original papers
Published online: 2022-08-16

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients from

Hungary and Iraq, suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and investigate the effects of MetS on

hospital outcomes, in particular mortality and its relation to differences in patients’ baseline characteristics.

Material and methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted in two cardiac centers between

May 2018 and May 2019. It included 164 consecutive ACS patients: 64 patients from the Cardiac Clinic

in Pécs, Hungary and 100 patients from Al Nassiryah Heart Center, Iraq. Baseline characteristics, clinical

management, and in-hospital and 30-day post-discharge outcomes were recorded.

Results: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among ACS patients in Iraq? was not significantly higher than

in Hungary (25.0% vs 34.1%; P = 0.306). There were no significant differences in age between those

with and without MetS (64.2 vs 63.3 years; P = 0.394). MetS was associated with a higher median BMI

(28.0 vs 23.7 kg/m2; P < 0.001), hyperlipidemia (37.8% vs 12.8%; P < 0.001), hypertension (48.8% vs

27.4%; P = 0.024), high cholesterol (5.4 vs 4.1 mmol/L; P < 0.001), high LDL-C (3.5 vs 2.6 mmol/L;

P < 0.001), and high triglycerides (1.4 vs 1.1 mmol/L; P < 0.001). MetS was associated with a higher

risk of out hospital re-infarction (12.8% vs 3.7%; P = 0.031) and MACE (17.7% and 6.1%; P = 0.027).

Conclusions: Current study did not show any significant difference in the incidence of MetS between

ACS patients in the two countries. But patients with MetS were significantly more likely to be associated

with MACE (P = 0.027).

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients from

Hungary and Iraq, suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and investigate the effects of MetS on

hospital outcomes, in particular mortality and its relation to differences in patients’ baseline characteristics.

Material and methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted in two cardiac centers between

May 2018 and May 2019. It included 164 consecutive ACS patients: 64 patients from the Cardiac Clinic

in Pécs, Hungary and 100 patients from Al Nassiryah Heart Center, Iraq. Baseline characteristics, clinical

management, and in-hospital and 30-day post-discharge outcomes were recorded.

Results: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among ACS patients in Iraq? was not significantly higher than

in Hungary (25.0% vs 34.1%; P = 0.306). There were no significant differences in age between those

with and without MetS (64.2 vs 63.3 years; P = 0.394). MetS was associated with a higher median BMI

(28.0 vs 23.7 kg/m2; P < 0.001), hyperlipidemia (37.8% vs 12.8%; P < 0.001), hypertension (48.8% vs

27.4%; P = 0.024), high cholesterol (5.4 vs 4.1 mmol/L; P < 0.001), high LDL-C (3.5 vs 2.6 mmol/L;

P < 0.001), and high triglycerides (1.4 vs 1.1 mmol/L; P < 0.001). MetS was associated with a higher

risk of out hospital re-infarction (12.8% vs 3.7%; P = 0.031) and MACE (17.7% and 6.1%; P = 0.027).

Conclusions: Current study did not show any significant difference in the incidence of MetS between

ACS patients in the two countries. But patients with MetS were significantly more likely to be associated

with MACE (P = 0.027).

Get Citation

Keywords

metabolic syndrome, outcomes, acute coronary syndrome, prevalence, major adverse cardiovascular events

About this article
Title

Prevalence and impact of metabolic syndrome on outcomes of acute coronary syndrome patients in two different countries

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 28, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

44-51

Published online

2022-08-16

Page views

3747

Article views/downloads

299

DOI

10.5603/AA.2022.0008

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2022;28(2):44-51.

Keywords

metabolic syndrome
outcomes
acute coronary syndrome
prevalence
major adverse cardiovascular events

Authors

Viola Keczeli
Ied Al-Sadoon
Orsolya Máté
Sára Jeges
Éva Polyák
Annamária Karamánné Pakai
Mercédesz Ahmann
Andrea Gubicskóné Kisbenedek
Zsófia Verzár

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