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Vol 1, No 1 (2021)
Review papers
Published online: 2021-06-01
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The role of selected metalloproteinases and some genetic factors in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

Stanisław Surma, Karolina Stolorz, Oskar Sierka, Aleksander Ludwik Sieroń, Marta Lesiak
DOI: 10.5603/AA.2021.0005
·
Acta Angiologica 2021;1(1):22-31.

open access

Vol 1, No 1 (2021)
Review papers
Published online: 2021-06-01

Abstract

Aortic aneurysm is defined as a pathologically dilated segment of the main artery. There are three main types of aortic aneurysms: real, pseudo and dissecting. The most common aneurysms are abdominal aortic aneurysms defined as vasodilatation equal to or above 30 mm. Abdominal aortic aneurysm development is usually asymptomatic. Many various risk factors have been linked to AAA development. The pathophysiology of AAA is associated with inflammation, smooth muscle cells apoptosis and matrix degradation. The changes always result from imbalance between active matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors – TIMPs. Abdominal aorta is the most common location for the aneurysm. The risk of developing AAA increases with age. It is more common in men. Its rupture is associated with a high risk of death. The pathogenesis of AAA is complex and still not fully understood. In pathophysiological processes, aortic wall degeneration and atherosclerosis dominate. The factors involved in the pathogenesis of AAA and TAA are not quite the same. Important factors involved in the formation of AAA and increasing the risk of its rupture are MMPs. Also, polymorphisms of numerous genes have been associated with the risk of developing AAA. The two groups of factors related to AAA formation and development are presented and discussed in this work.

Abstract

Aortic aneurysm is defined as a pathologically dilated segment of the main artery. There are three main types of aortic aneurysms: real, pseudo and dissecting. The most common aneurysms are abdominal aortic aneurysms defined as vasodilatation equal to or above 30 mm. Abdominal aortic aneurysm development is usually asymptomatic. Many various risk factors have been linked to AAA development. The pathophysiology of AAA is associated with inflammation, smooth muscle cells apoptosis and matrix degradation. The changes always result from imbalance between active matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors – TIMPs. Abdominal aorta is the most common location for the aneurysm. The risk of developing AAA increases with age. It is more common in men. Its rupture is associated with a high risk of death. The pathogenesis of AAA is complex and still not fully understood. In pathophysiological processes, aortic wall degeneration and atherosclerosis dominate. The factors involved in the pathogenesis of AAA and TAA are not quite the same. Important factors involved in the formation of AAA and increasing the risk of its rupture are MMPs. Also, polymorphisms of numerous genes have been associated with the risk of developing AAA. The two groups of factors related to AAA formation and development are presented and discussed in this work.

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Keywords

abdominal aortic aneurysm pathogenesis; metalloproteinases; risk factors

About this article
Title

The role of selected metalloproteinases and some genetic factors in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 1, No 1 (2021)

Pages

22-31

Published online

2021-06-01

DOI

10.5603/AA.2021.0005

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2021;1(1):22-31.

Keywords

abdominal aortic aneurysm pathogenesis
metalloproteinases
risk factors

Authors

Stanisław Surma
Karolina Stolorz
Oskar Sierka
Aleksander Ludwik Sieroń
Marta Lesiak

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