open access

Vol 15, No 2 (2009)
Original papers
Published online: 2009-05-11
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Ultrasonographic assessment of haemodynamic parameters of collateral circulation in patients with an occluded superficial femoral artery

Robert Juszkat, Andrzej Aleksander Jawień, Michał Migda, Katarzyna Pawlaczyk, Przemysław Nowak, Grzegorz Oszkinis, Fryderyk Pukacki, Ryszard Staniszewski, Wacław Majewski
Acta Angiologica 2009;15(2):50-60.

open access

Vol 15, No 2 (2009)
Original papers
Published online: 2009-05-11

Abstract


Background. The purpose of the research was to try to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of Doppler ultrasound imaging of the popliteal artery in cases of an existing occlusion of the femoro-popliteal segment of the lower-limb arteries caused by atherosclerosis.
Material and methods. The subjects of the tests were patients with an occlusion in the femoro-popliteal segment and retained patency of the popliteal artery's bifurcation, and a lack of haemodynamically significant lesions in the iliac arteries. The researchers compared the consistency of results of Doppler ultrasound imaging of the popliteal artery to results of the ankle-brachial index (ABI).
Results. Measurements of diameter, cross-sectional area, volume, and pulsatility of blood flow (PI and PSV/EDV) through the popliteal artery were consistent with ABI value and with clinical symptoms (statistical significance was reached).
Conclusions. Doppler ultrasound imaging is a useful diagnostic method of assessing the state of peripheral blood vessels and in making therapeutic decisions in cases of femoropopliteal occlusion.

Abstract


Background. The purpose of the research was to try to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of Doppler ultrasound imaging of the popliteal artery in cases of an existing occlusion of the femoro-popliteal segment of the lower-limb arteries caused by atherosclerosis.
Material and methods. The subjects of the tests were patients with an occlusion in the femoro-popliteal segment and retained patency of the popliteal artery's bifurcation, and a lack of haemodynamically significant lesions in the iliac arteries. The researchers compared the consistency of results of Doppler ultrasound imaging of the popliteal artery to results of the ankle-brachial index (ABI).
Results. Measurements of diameter, cross-sectional area, volume, and pulsatility of blood flow (PI and PSV/EDV) through the popliteal artery were consistent with ABI value and with clinical symptoms (statistical significance was reached).
Conclusions. Doppler ultrasound imaging is a useful diagnostic method of assessing the state of peripheral blood vessels and in making therapeutic decisions in cases of femoropopliteal occlusion.
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Keywords

femoro-popliteal occlusion; value of Doppler ultrasound imaging in the assessment of collateral circulation

About this article
Title

Ultrasonographic assessment of haemodynamic parameters of collateral circulation in patients with an occluded superficial femoral artery

Journal

Acta Angiologica

Issue

Vol 15, No 2 (2009)

Pages

50-60

Published online

2009-05-11

Bibliographic record

Acta Angiologica 2009;15(2):50-60.

Keywords

femoro-popliteal occlusion
value of Doppler ultrasound imaging in the assessment of collateral circulation

Authors

Robert Juszkat
Andrzej Aleksander Jawień
Michał Migda
Katarzyna Pawlaczyk
Przemysław Nowak
Grzegorz Oszkinis
Fryderyk Pukacki
Ryszard Staniszewski
Wacław Majewski

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