open access

Vol 19 (2021): Continuous Publishing
Research paper
Published online: 2021-11-02
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Knowledge of comprehensive sexuality education (HIV-component) among young girls in Africa: implications for sex education policies and programmes

Miracle Ayomikum Adesina, Adesola O Abiodun, Tolulope I Olajire, Isaac I Olufadewa, Daha Garba Muhammad1, Ogheneruona F Onothoja
DOI: 10.5603/SP.2021.0011
·
Seksuologia Polska 2021;19.
Affiliations
  1. Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Teaching hospital Bauchi, Hardawa Misau Bauchi state, 740213 Bauchi, Nigeria

open access

Vol 19 (2021): Continuous Publishing
Prace oryginalne (nadesłane)
Published online: 2021-11-02

Abstract

Introduction: The sexual and reproductive health problems such as HIV or AIDS, faced by youths has been largely

attributed to insufficiency or lack of necessary information to make informed choices and prevent adverse

sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Hence, to reduce these problems, it is expedient that we embrace

a potent prevention strategy: Comprehensive Sexuality Education. Therefore, this study seeks to investigate

the knowledge of young African girls about comprehensive sexuality education, especially the HIV component.

Material and methods: This study made use of secondary data collated by the UNFPA on comprehensive

knowledge about HIV among young girls between 15 and 24 years of age in 28 African countries. The data

obtained from the UNFPA database was collated and analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2019.

Results: Namibia is the only African country surveyed that had more than 50% of young girls between 15

and 24 years of age with comprehensive knowledge about HIV. Chad had the poorest result with only 4% of

young girls (15–24 years) with good and comprehensive knowledge of HIV. Four African countries had half

or more of young girls between 20 and 24 years of age with comprehensive knowledge of HIV. Only six of

the 28 nations surveyed had young girls (15-19 years of age) with very good and intensive knowledge of HIV.

Conclusion: There appears to be a poor knowledge of comprehensive sexuality education across African

countries. Also, barriers to proper implementation and low effectiveness of CSE at the country level were

also presented. These should be appropriately dissected in making youth, sexual, and reproductive health,

as well as education policies and programs

Abstract

Introduction: The sexual and reproductive health problems such as HIV or AIDS, faced by youths has been largely

attributed to insufficiency or lack of necessary information to make informed choices and prevent adverse

sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Hence, to reduce these problems, it is expedient that we embrace

a potent prevention strategy: Comprehensive Sexuality Education. Therefore, this study seeks to investigate

the knowledge of young African girls about comprehensive sexuality education, especially the HIV component.

Material and methods: This study made use of secondary data collated by the UNFPA on comprehensive

knowledge about HIV among young girls between 15 and 24 years of age in 28 African countries. The data

obtained from the UNFPA database was collated and analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2019.

Results: Namibia is the only African country surveyed that had more than 50% of young girls between 15

and 24 years of age with comprehensive knowledge about HIV. Chad had the poorest result with only 4% of

young girls (15–24 years) with good and comprehensive knowledge of HIV. Four African countries had half

or more of young girls between 20 and 24 years of age with comprehensive knowledge of HIV. Only six of

the 28 nations surveyed had young girls (15-19 years of age) with very good and intensive knowledge of HIV.

Conclusion: There appears to be a poor knowledge of comprehensive sexuality education across African

countries. Also, barriers to proper implementation and low effectiveness of CSE at the country level were

also presented. These should be appropriately dissected in making youth, sexual, and reproductive health,

as well as education policies and programs

Get Citation

Keywords

knowledge, sex education, HIV, young girls, africa, comprehensive

About this article
Title

Knowledge of comprehensive sexuality education (HIV-component) among young girls in Africa: implications for sex education policies and programmes

Journal

Seksuologia Polska (Polish Sexology)

Issue

Vol 19 (2021): Continuous Publishing

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-11-02

Page views

1742

Article views/downloads

113

DOI

10.5603/SP.2021.0011

Bibliographic record

Seksuologia Polska 2021;19.

Keywords

knowledge
sex education
HIV
young girls
africa
comprehensive

Authors

Miracle Ayomikum Adesina
Adesola O Abiodun
Tolulope I Olajire
Isaac I Olufadewa
Daha Garba Muhammad
Ogheneruona F Onothoja

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