Vol 19 (2021): Continuous Publishing
Review paper
Published online: 2021-03-22
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Psychosocial factors related to sexual communication: a systematic review

Magdalena Liberacka-Dwojak, Paweł Izdebski
DOI: 10.5603/SP.2021.0002
·
Seksuologia Polska 2021;19.

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Vol 19 (2021): Continuous Publishing
Prace poglądowe (nadesłane)
Published online: 2021-03-22

Abstract

Introduction: Open sexual communication in the relationship is one of the main components of close partnership, as well as a key factor in maintaining sexual health, sexual satisfaction, but also a key element in achieving sexual goals and meeting the needs. The purpose of this paper is to review researches that determine psychosocial factors related to sexual communication. Materials and methods: A systematic review was conducted using GoogleScholar, PsycArticles, Academic Research Source eJournals, Healthsource – Consumer Edition and Medline. 22 quantitative and qualitative studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Results: Sexual communication was associated with: attachment, self-esteem, personality factors, awareness of risk and one’s sexuality, social anxiety, self-efficacy, self-acceptance, perceived threats to oneself, partner or relationship, assertiveness in sexual behavior, experience of use in childhood, stereotypes, cultural norms, parental communication about sexual topics, courage, a sense of comfort or broadly understood communication skills. Conclusions: The systematic review indicates the contribution of intra- and interpersonal factors, as well as communication competences in sexual communication. The importance of communication at various levels was emphasized: partnership, parental, communication with professionals. The results were discussed in an individual and relational perspective.

Abstract

Introduction: Open sexual communication in the relationship is one of the main components of close partnership, as well as a key factor in maintaining sexual health, sexual satisfaction, but also a key element in achieving sexual goals and meeting the needs. The purpose of this paper is to review researches that determine psychosocial factors related to sexual communication. Materials and methods: A systematic review was conducted using GoogleScholar, PsycArticles, Academic Research Source eJournals, Healthsource – Consumer Edition and Medline. 22 quantitative and qualitative studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Results: Sexual communication was associated with: attachment, self-esteem, personality factors, awareness of risk and one’s sexuality, social anxiety, self-efficacy, self-acceptance, perceived threats to oneself, partner or relationship, assertiveness in sexual behavior, experience of use in childhood, stereotypes, cultural norms, parental communication about sexual topics, courage, a sense of comfort or broadly understood communication skills. Conclusions: The systematic review indicates the contribution of intra- and interpersonal factors, as well as communication competences in sexual communication. The importance of communication at various levels was emphasized: partnership, parental, communication with professionals. The results were discussed in an individual and relational perspective.

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Keywords

sexual communication, systematic review, psychosocial factors

About this article
Title

Psychosocial factors related to sexual communication: a systematic review

Journal

Seksuologia Polska (Polish Sexology)

Issue

Vol 19 (2021): Continuous Publishing

Article type

Review paper

Published online

2021-03-22

DOI

10.5603/SP.2021.0002

Bibliographic record

Seksuologia Polska 2021;19.

Keywords

sexual communication
systematic review
psychosocial factors

Authors

Magdalena Liberacka-Dwojak
Paweł Izdebski

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