open access

Vol 19, No 3 (2014)
Published online: 2014-05-01
Submitted: 2013-04-20
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Modeling the time dependent biodistribution of Samarium-153 ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonate using compartmental analysis

Parandoush Abbasian, Monika Foroghy, Amir Reza Jalilian, Amir Hakimi, Simindokht Shirvani-Arani
DOI: 10.1016/j.rpor.2013.12.002
·
Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2014;19(3):214-220.

open access

Vol 19, No 3 (2014)
Published online: 2014-05-01
Submitted: 2013-04-20

Abstract

Aim

The main purpose of this work was to develop a pharmacokinetic model for the bone pain palliation agent Samarium-153 ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonate ([153Sm]-EDTMP) in normal rats to analyze the behavior of the complex.

Background

The use of compartmental analysis allows a mathematical separation of tissues and organs to determine the concentration of activity in each fraction of interest. Biodistribution studies are expensive and difficult to carry out in humans, but such data can be obtained easily in rodents.

Materials and methods

We have developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for scaling up activity concentration in each organ versus time. The mathematical model uses physiological parameters including organ volumes, blood flow rates, and vascular permabilities; the compartments (organs) are connected anatomically. This allows the use of scale-up techniques to predict new complex distribution in humans in each organ.

Results

The concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in various organs was measured at different times. The temporal behavior of biodistribution of 153Sm-EDTMP was modeled and drawn as a function of time.

Conclusions

The variation of pharmaceutical concentration in all organs is described with summation of 6–10 exponential terms and it approximates our experimental data with precision better than 2%.

Abstract

Aim

The main purpose of this work was to develop a pharmacokinetic model for the bone pain palliation agent Samarium-153 ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonate ([153Sm]-EDTMP) in normal rats to analyze the behavior of the complex.

Background

The use of compartmental analysis allows a mathematical separation of tissues and organs to determine the concentration of activity in each fraction of interest. Biodistribution studies are expensive and difficult to carry out in humans, but such data can be obtained easily in rodents.

Materials and methods

We have developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for scaling up activity concentration in each organ versus time. The mathematical model uses physiological parameters including organ volumes, blood flow rates, and vascular permabilities; the compartments (organs) are connected anatomically. This allows the use of scale-up techniques to predict new complex distribution in humans in each organ.

Results

The concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in various organs was measured at different times. The temporal behavior of biodistribution of 153Sm-EDTMP was modeled and drawn as a function of time.

Conclusions

The variation of pharmaceutical concentration in all organs is described with summation of 6–10 exponential terms and it approximates our experimental data with precision better than 2%.

Get Citation

Keywords

Biodistribution modeling; Compartmental analysis; [[[ce:sup loc=" pre" ]]153Sm]-EDTMP

About this article
Title

Modeling the time dependent biodistribution of Samarium-153 ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonate using compartmental analysis

Journal

Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

Issue

Vol 19, No 3 (2014)

Pages

214-220

Published online

2014-05-01

DOI

10.1016/j.rpor.2013.12.002

Bibliographic record

Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2014;19(3):214-220.

Keywords

Biodistribution modeling
Compartmental analysis
[[[ce:sup loc="pre"]]153Sm]-EDTMP

Authors

Parandoush Abbasian
Monika Foroghy
Amir Reza Jalilian
Amir Hakimi
Simindokht Shirvani-Arani

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