Vol 17, No 2 (2020)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane
Published online: 2020-05-30
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Pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease current trends

Leszek Bidzan
DOI: 10.5603/PSYCH.2020.0016
·
Psychiatria 2020;17(2):87-94.

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Vol 17, No 2 (2020)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane
Published online: 2020-05-30

Abstract

Approximately 46 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Treatments to prevent or slow down cognitive
decline in AD remain an urgent therapeutic need. During the last decades the use of b secretase inhibitors as well
as immunotherapy against Ab, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents as well as natural products and many others
have been investigated. Although considerable efforts have been made to develop more effective therapeutic agents
for AD therapy, clinical trials failed to reach efficacy endpoints in improving cognitive function in most cases to date or
have been terminated due to adverse events. Current pharmacotherapy of AD is still limited to cholinesterase inhibitors
and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist memantine which were approved at the turn of the century.
Despite critical opinions on the efficacy of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, it should be said that these
drugs improve memory and other cognitive functions throughout most of the duration of the disease. As Memantine,
and the AChEIs target two different aspects of AD pathology their complementary mechanisms offer superior benefit as
combination therapy. Moreover preclinical studies have shown that memantine and AChEIs have neuroprotective effects.

Abstract

Approximately 46 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Treatments to prevent or slow down cognitive
decline in AD remain an urgent therapeutic need. During the last decades the use of b secretase inhibitors as well
as immunotherapy against Ab, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents as well as natural products and many others
have been investigated. Although considerable efforts have been made to develop more effective therapeutic agents
for AD therapy, clinical trials failed to reach efficacy endpoints in improving cognitive function in most cases to date or
have been terminated due to adverse events. Current pharmacotherapy of AD is still limited to cholinesterase inhibitors
and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist memantine which were approved at the turn of the century.
Despite critical opinions on the efficacy of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, it should be said that these
drugs improve memory and other cognitive functions throughout most of the duration of the disease. As Memantine,
and the AChEIs target two different aspects of AD pathology their complementary mechanisms offer superior benefit as
combination therapy. Moreover preclinical studies have shown that memantine and AChEIs have neuroprotective effects.

Get Citation

Keywords

Alzheimer’s disease, pharmacotherapy, współczesne możliwości

About this article
Title

Pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease current trends

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 17, No 2 (2020)

Pages

87-94

Published online

2020-05-30

DOI

10.5603/PSYCH.2020.0016

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2020;17(2):87-94.

Keywords

Alzheimer’s disease
pharmacotherapy
współczesne możliwości

Authors

Leszek Bidzan

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